8th MPs conduct new decontamination testing for vehicles

| May 14, 2010 | 0 Comments

 

Pfc. Marcus Fichtl
8th Military Police Brigade Public Affairs
8th Theater Sustainment Command

A Soldier from the 71st Chemical Company, 8th Military Police Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, decontaminates a vehicle with the M26 Joint Service Transportable Decontamination System Small Scale during a field exercise at Schofield Barracks, April 23. (Maj. Jeff Parker | 8th Military Police Brigade Public Affairs)SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers of the 71st Chemical Company, 8th Military Police Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, here, conducted baseline tests on a new decontamination system near Bowen Park, here, April 19-23.

The tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the new system versus the old system, and to improve the effectiveness of the company as a Pacific Command asset.

Current decontamination protocols and systems are based on vehicles two to three generations out, said Capt. William Brysacz, commander of the 71st Chem. Co. A revamp and re-evaluation of the systems was needed.

The new decontamination system, the M26 Joint Service Transportable Decontamination System Small Scale, is a new power washer designed to reach the nooks and crannies of the Army’s new, more complex vehicles, and decontaminate them quickly and efficiency, said Brysacz.

“The new system is more powerful, more durable to decontaminate equipment quicker and (to) get the vehicles back out into the fight,” said Brysacz.

The decontamination process is a multi-step system, said Sgt. 1st Class Crystal Triplett, decontamination platoon sergeant, 71st Chem. Co.  

The process starts with removing large debris, followed by a thorough cleanse with the new M26. The next step is weathering the vehicles in the environment, with a final decontamination check at the end.  

The new M26 system demands less physically, making life a little bit easier. Still, the chemical suits the Soldiers’ wear while operating the M26 force them to operate in strict rest/work cycles, because operating in the suit is physically demanding, said Triplett. 

“The Soldiers love the new system,” said Brysacz.

Soldiers weren’t the only people witnessing the functions of the 

new equipment, here. VIPs from 

John Hopkins to subject matter experts from Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., were on hand to witness the exercise, said Triplett. 

Regardless of who watches, ultimately, any increase in the capability of the 71st Chemical directly affects its value as a PACOM asset, said Brysacz.

“We’ve been increasing the 71st’s capabilities not only through the development of better equipment and updated field procedures, but by training with hazardous response groups in the PACOM region from Singapore to civil support teams here in Hawaii,” said Brysacz. 

“Threats can sprout up anywhere within the region from the Philippines, Thailand, and here at home,” he continued.

Overseas contingency operations forces the Army to fight decentralized and unconventional opponents, said Brysacz. 

The 71st Chem. Co. provides that multifaceted defense. 

“With our training and equipment, the 71st provides a first-time go (for decontamination),” said Brysacz.

Pfc. Marcus Fichtl8th Military Police Brigade  Public Affairs8th Theater Sustainment CommandSCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers of the 71st Chemical Company, 8th Military Police Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, here, conducted baseline tests on a new decontamination system near Bowen Park, here, April 19-23.The tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the new system versus the old system, and to improve the effectiveness of the company as a Pacific Command asset.Current decontamination protocols and systems are based on vehicles two to three generations out, said Capt. William Brysacz, commander of the 71st Chem. Co. A revamp and re-evaluation of the systems was needed.The new decontamination system, the M26 Joint Service Transportable Decontamination System Small Scale, is a new power washer designed to reach the nooks and crannies of the Army’s new, more complex vehicles, and decontaminate them quickly and efficiency, said Brysacz.“The new system is more powerful, more durable to decontaminate equipment quicker and (to) get the vehicles back out into the fight,” said Brysacz.The decontamination process is a multi-step system, said Sgt. 1st Class Crystal Triplett, decontamination platoon sergeant, 71st Chem. Co.  The process starts with removing large debris, followed by a thorough cleanse with the new M26. The next step is weathering the vehicles in the environment, with a final decontamination check at the end.  The new M26 system demands less physically, making life a little bit easier. Still, the chemical suits the Soldiers’ wear while operating the M26 force them to operate in strict rest/work cycles, because operating in the suit is physically demanding, said Triplett. “The Soldiers love the new system,” said Brysacz.Soldiers weren’t the only people witnessing the functions of the new equipment, here. VIPs from John Hopkins to subject matter experts from Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., were on hand to witness the exercise, said Triplett. Regardless of who watches, ultimately, any increase in the capability of the 71st Chemical directly affects its value as a PACOM asset, said Brysacz.“We’ve been increasing the 71st’s capabilities not only through the development of better equipment and updated field procedures, but by training with hazardous response groups in the PACOM region from Singapore to civil support teams here in Hawaii,” said Brysacz. “Threats can sprout up anywhere within the region from the Philippines, Thailand, and here at home,” he continued.Overseas contingency operations forces the Army to fight decentralized and unconventional opponents, said Brysacz. The 71st Chem. Co. provides that multifaceted defense. “With our training and equipment, the 71st provides a first-time go (for decontamination),” said Brysacz.

 

Category: News, Training

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