Footsteps in Faith: We all must drive on in the face of adversity, with God leading the way

| May 21, 2010 | 0 Comments

Chaplain (Capt.) Keith Ferrell
65th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command

FerrellEach and every day across the world, thousands of Soldiers, Army civilians and family members look into their own mirrors and see a thin, stretched-out version of themselves. 

The reasons are evident and around us all the time. We are a nation at war, and with that come multiple deployments, field exercises, and families that are stressed beyond words. 

The question is, how do we carry on in the face of such demands? Thankfully, there is an answer, although it does not seem popular at times.

Almost 20 years ago, I had the incredible opportunity of going through Basic Training in Fort Sill, Okla. While there, we sang a song that motivated one and all to overcome the challenge of training. 

The cadence went something like this: “I’ll keep on … keep on keeping right on. I’ll drive on … keep on driving right on. While I march … all day … and I march … all night … to the beating drum.” 

Quite simply, the cadence encourages all to drive on no matter what obstacle they may encounter. This is what the British author and philosopher Edmund Burke had in mind when he wrote, “All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for a few good men to do nothing.” 

It is this determination that has caused countless thousands to make it through training, deployments, challenging schools and impossible assignments. 

But that determination alone, however powerful a purpose it may serve, sometimes falters, and we need more.

The Bible gives us the same encouragement as Burke; yet, it comes also with a promise. Isaiah 40 says that those “who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.” 

What powerful words these are, for in them we find the philosophy of the spiritual life. Not only are they an encouragement to never give up, but an admonishment to drive on in the face of adversity. 

It is in this promise to God’s people that we may find that ability to do what must be done, to keep on when we feel like giving in, and to continue to walk through the valleys that life throws our way. 

When we stop to view God’s creation, to marvel at his love, and allow our hope to rest in him, then we are strengthened. It is the “second wind” of our spiritual lives that allows us to keep running this race called life. This hope implies that we trust God above even ourselves, above other men, and beyond the temporary promises of the world.

Take time today to place your hope in the Lord, and not in men, and see just where God leads you. And always remember when you’re going through the fire, to keep walking and to keep God’s promise in your heart. 

If you do, nothing will keep you down.

CHaplain (CaPT.) Keith Ferrell65th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment CommandEach and every day across the world, thousands of Soldiers, Army civilians and family members look into their own mirrors and see a thin, stretched-out version of themselves. The reasons are evident and around us all the time. We are a nation at war, and with that come multiple deployments, field exercises, and families that are stressed beyond words. The question is, how do we carry on in the face of such demands? Thankfully, there is an answer, although it does not seem popular at times.Almost 20 years ago, I had the incredible opportunity of going through Basic Training in Fort Sill, Okla. While there, we sang a song that motivated one and all to overcome the challenge of training. The cadence went something like this: “I’ll keep on … keep on keeping right on. I’ll drive on … keep on driving right on. While I march … all day … and I march … all night … to the beating drum.” Quite simply, the cadence encourages all to drive on no matter what obstacle they may encounter. This is what the British author and philosopher Edmund Burke had in mind when he wrote, “All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for a few good men to do nothing.” It is this determination that has caused countless thousands to make it through training, deployments, challenging schools and impossible assignments. But that determination alone, however powerful a purpose it may serve, sometimes falters, and we need more.The Bible gives us the same encouragement as Burke; yet, it comes also with a promise. Isaiah 40 says that those “who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.” What powerful words these are, for in them we find the philosophy of the spiritual life. Not only are they an encouragement to never give up, but an admonishment to drive on in the face of adversity. It is in this promise to God’s people that we may find that ability to do what must be done, to keep on when we feel like giving in, and to continue to walk through the valleys that life throws our way. When we stop to view God’s creation, to marvel at his love, and allow our hope to rest in him, then we are strengthened. It is the “second wind” of our spiritual lives that allows us to keep running this race called life. This hope implies that we trust God above even ourselves, above other men, and beyond the temporary promises of the world.Take time today to place your hope in the Lord, and not in men, and see just where God leads you. And always remember when you’re going through the fire, to keep walking and to keep God’s promise in your heart. If you do, nothing will keep you down.

Category: Footsteps in Faith, News, Standing Columns

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