Clinic changes command

| July 9, 2010 | 0 Comments

Tripler Army Medical Center
News Release

Col. Joseph Bird, center, incoming commander, Schofield Barracks Health Clinic, receives the colors from Brig. Gen. Keith Gallagher, commanding general, Pacific Regional Medical Command and Tripler Army Medical Center during the clinic’s change of command ceremony at TAMC, June 29. (Courtesy Photo)TRIPLER ARMY MEDICAL CENTER — With the blue skies of Hawaii overhead, Col. Michael Brumage relinquished command of the Schofield Barracks Health Clinic to Col. Joseph Bird, here, June 29.

According to Brig. Gen. Keith Gallagher, commanding general of the Pacific Regional Medical Command and Tripler Army Medical Center, Brumage had a genuine care for patients and did an outstanding job as commander. 

Brumage oversaw the revitalization of services, the expansion of the facility, and a community effort that reached Soldiers and family members who sought care at the clinic.

“As all of you know, health care is personal,” Gallagher said in his remarks. “It requires the utmost confidentiality. It is often times unpleasant. It requires the utmost professionalism by a skilled and capable provider. 

“Without a doubt, the Schofield Barracks Health Clinic, under the leadership of Brumage, delivered quality medicine every day to the 25th Infantry Division Soldiers and their families, as well as the retirees who received their care here,” Gallagher said. “He instilled confidence and fostered a work ethic of caring, getting the job done, compassion and dignity.”

Brumage garnered the support needed to build a world-class traumatic brain injury center, here, that offers screening and treatment therapies. He was instrumental in establishing the Pohai Pulama, or “the Caring Circle,” which fostered collaboration among garrison and unit representatives.

“Pohai Pulama clarified roles and responsibilities, and eliminated confusion and friction points. It will pay tremendous dividends for many years to come,” Gallagher said.

“To the magnificent providers, support staff and Soldiers of the SBHC, you have done more in two years than many do in a career,” Brumage said during his speech. “It has been an honor to witness your feats. It’s hard to leave, but it’s easier knowing that we were fortunate to be here in the first place.

 “Brig. Gen. Jones (former PRMC and TAMC commander) many times said that Schofield is the biggest and best clinic in the Army,” Brumage added. “He was right, and the Soldiers and staff made it that way. Likewise, this is the best community in the Army. It was a privilege to be a part of (this community).”

As the new commander of SBHC, Bird said he found the ceremony to be a humbling experience while taking command.

“I’m delighted to be in Hawaii again,” Bird said in his remarks. “This is really a homecoming for me, and I look forward to reconnecting with this special community.” 

Bird spent part of his childhood in Hawaii, and his family lived in Waianae for several years.

“We came to the SBHC for our health care,” Bird said. “One of my lasting memories is of my father bringing me to the clinic with a broken arm, and the relief I felt after the arm was set. I remember distinctly the compassionate care of the doctor and the beautiful grounds of the clinic. 

“I am glad to see that these basic things have not changed,” he added. “‘No ka oi’ – we are the best. I truly believe this, and I’m proud to be serving with you.”

TRIPLER ARMY MEDICAL CENTERNews ReleaseTRIPLER ARMY MEDICAL CENTER — With the blue skies of Hawaii overhead, Col. Michael Brumage relinquished command of the Schofield Barracks Health Clinic to Col. Joseph Bird, here, June 29.According to Brig. Gen. Keith Gallagher, commanding general of the Pacific Regional Medical Command and Tripler Army Medical Center, Brumage had a genuine care for patients and did an outstanding job as commander. Brumage oversaw the revitalization of services, the expansion of the facility, and a community effort that reached Soldiers and family members who sought care at the clinic.“As all of you know, health care is personal,” Gallagher said in his remarks. “It requires the utmost confidentiality. It is often times unpleasant. It requires the utmost professionalism by a skilled and capable provider. “Without a doubt, the Schofield Barracks Health Clinic, under the leadership of Brumage, delivered quality medicine every day to the 25th Infantry Division Soldiers and their families, as well as the retirees who received their care here,” Gallagher said. “He instilled confidence and fostered a work ethic of caring, getting the job done, compassion and dignity.”Brumage garnered the support needed to build a world-class traumatic brain injury center, here, that offers screening and treatment therapies. He was instrumental in establishing the Pohai Pulama, or “the Caring Circle,” which fostered collaboration among garrison and unit representatives.“Pohai Pulama clarified roles and responsibilities, and eliminated confusion and friction points. It will pay tremendous dividends for many years to come,” Gallagher said.“To the magnificent providers, support staff and Soldiers of the SBHC, you have done more in two years than many do in a career,” Brumage said during his speech. “It has been an honor to witness your feats. It’s hard to leave, but it’s easier knowing that we were fortunate to be here in the first place. “Brig. Gen. Jones (former PRMC and TAMC commander) many times said that Schofield is the biggest and best clinic in the Army,” Brumage added. “He was right, and the Soldiers and staff made it that way. Likewise, this is the best community in the Army. It was a privilege to be a part of (this community).”As the new commander of SBHC, Bird said he found the ceremony to be a humbling experience while taking command.“I’m delighted to be in Hawaii again,” Bird said in his remarks. “This is really a homecoming for me, and I look forward to reconnecting with this special community.” Bird spent part of his childhood in Hawaii, and his family lived in Waianae for several years.“We came to the SBHC for our health care,” Bird said. “One of my lasting memories is of my father bringing me to the clinic with a broken arm, and the relief I felt after the arm was set. I remember distinctly the compassionate care of the doctor and the beautiful grounds of the clinic. “I am glad to see that these basic things have not changed,” he added. “‘No ka oi’ – we are the best. I truly believe this, and I’m proud to be serving with you.”

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