Real-world Signal mission supports UFG success

| September 7, 2010 | 0 Comments

Story and Photo by
Liana Mayo
311th Signal Command Public Affairs

Capt. Kevin Vazquez (left) and Sgt. 1st Class Gregory Mathis, both of 311th Signal Command, discuss possible solutions for CENTRIX-K, a classified network shared by the U.S. military and the ROK, during UFG 2010, in the Forward Command Post, at the Schofield Barracks Battle Command Training Center, Aug. 19. SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — While most of the nearly 90,000 participants of the annual Ulchi Freedom Guardian 2010 exercise experienced challenges and accomplishments, a team of about 40 Soldiers and civilians in the 311th Signal Command experienced stress that cannot be simulated. 

Working around the clock in the Forward Command Post at the Battle Command Training Center, here, the 311th fulfilled the real-world mission of providing secure and dependable lines of communication between all participants throughout the Pacific region during the exercise held Aug. 16-26.

The signal team maintained three networks: the NIPR, an unclassified network; SIPR, a U.S.-only classified network; and CENTRIX-K, a classified network shared by the U.S. military and the Republic of Korea. 

The constant presence of a secure signal was vital to the success of this computer-assisted exercise that tests and builds the ability of the ROK and U.S. alliance to translate information superiority into actionable decision-making, in order to prevent and prevail against the full range of current and future threats to the ROK and the region. 

“Although this Combined Forces Command exercise is notional for other participants, it is real-world for us, and a good opportunity to validate our support requirements to our fellow commands in Hawaii, the 8th Theater Sustainment Command and the 18th Medical Command,” said Lt. Col. Scott Baer, deputy chief of staff for operations and training, 311th Signal Command. “We took this opportunity to not only validate, but also to activate our Troop Program Unit Soldiers to take over functions of the command, which they would have to do if deployed.”

For the first time, Staff Sgt. Wesley Leiter, a TPU Soldier in 311th’s Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment out of Costa Mesa, Calif., operated above the platoon level.

“(It was) an incredible experience,” Leiter said, about serving as the operations and training battle noncommissioned officer at the FCP. “It was fascinating to learn about all the units we support for U.S. Army-Pacific, as the Signal Command for the Pacific.”

Three 311th Soldiers traveled to Seoul, South Korea, to serve as liaison officers for the ROK and CFC, and to facilitate coordinated signal operations throughout the Pacific. Soldiers and civilians at the 311th’s FCP maintained control of the exercise network while continuing to fulfill the 311th’s core mission of maintaining and defending the Pacific LandWar Net.

“What makes an exercise like UFG unique for us as Signaleers is that while most of the exercise is simulated, the communication aspect of the mission is real,” said Capt. Amanda Bielski, a TPU Soldier from Fort Meade, Md., who is assigned to the 311th Signal Command and served as the operations and training battle captain in the FCP. “While other units can simulate their success, we must be successful in order for those units to participate. This makes for a very challenging and rewarding experience, because you do see the results of your hard work every day.”

Story and Photo by Liana Mayo311th Signal Command Public AffairsSCHOFIELD BARRACKS — While most of the nearly 90,000 participants of the annual Ulchi Freedom Guardian 2010 exercise experienced challenges and accomplishments, a team of about 40 Soldiers and civilians in the 311th Signal Command experienced stress that cannot be simulated. Working around the clock in the Forward Command Post at the Battle Command Training Center, here, the 311th fulfilled the real-world mission of providing secure and dependable lines of communication between all participants throughout the Pacific region during the exercise held Aug. 16-26.The signal team maintained three networks: the NIPR, an unclassified network; SIPR, a U.S.-only classified network; and CENTRIX-K, a classified network shared by the U.S. military and the Republic of Korea. The constant presence of a secure signal was vital to the success of this computer-assisted exercise that tests and builds the ability of the ROK and U.S. alliance to translate information superiority into actionable decision-making, in order to prevent and prevail against the full range of current and future threats to the ROK and the region. “Although this Combined Forces Command exercise is notional for other participants, it is real-world for us, and a good opportunity to validate our support requirements to our fellow commands in Hawaii, the 8th Theater Sustainment Command and the 18th Medical Command,” said Lt. Col. Scott Baer, deputy chief of staff for operations and training, 311th Signal Command. “We took this opportunity to not only validate, but also to activate our Troop Program Unit Soldiers to take over functions of the command, which they would have to do if deployed.”For the first time, Staff Sgt. Wesley Leiter, a TPU Soldier in 311th’s Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment out of Costa Mesa, Calif., operated above the platoon level.“(It was) an incredible experience,” Leiter said, about serving as the operations and training battle noncommissioned officer at the FCP. “It was fascinating to learn about all the units we support for U.S. Army-Pacific, as the Signal Command for the Pacific.”Three 311th Soldiers traveled to Seoul, South Korea, to serve as liaison officers for the ROK and CFC, and to facilitate coordinated signal operations throughout the Pacific. Soldiers and civilians at the 311th’s FCP maintained control of the exercise network while continuing to fulfill the 311th’s core mission of maintaining and defending the Pacific LandWar Net.“What makes an exercise like UFG unique for us as Signaleers is that while most of the exercise is simulated, the communication aspect of the mission is real,” said Capt. Amanda Bielski, a TPU Soldier from Fort Meade, Md., who is assigned to the 311th Signal Command and served as the operations and training battle captain in the FCP. “While other units can simulate their success, we must be successful in order for those units to participate. This makes for a very challenging and rewarding experience, because you do see the results of your hard work every day.”

Category: Exercises, News, Training

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