Total Signal Team supports YS 59

| February 11, 2011 | 0 Comments
CAMP KENGUN, Japan — Soldiers with the 78th Signal Battalion, 516th Sig. Brigade, 311th Sig. Command, operate the Exercise Control Help Desk and set up computers and communication lines, here, during Yama Sakura 59. (Lt. Col. Curtis L. Tygart | 78th Signal Battalion, 516th Sig. Brigade., 311th Sig. Command)

CAMP KENGUN, Japan — Soldiers with the 78th Signal Battalion, 516th Sig. Brigade, 311th Sig. Command, operate the Exercise Control Help Desk and set up computers and communication lines, here, during Yama Sakura 59. (Lt. Col. Curtis L. Tygart | 78th Signal Battalion, 516th Sig. Brigade., 311th Sig. Command)

Staff Sgt. Bradley Dunn, 78th Signal Battalion, 516th Signal Brigade, 311th Signal Command &
Capt. Jacob Dressel, 58th Signal Battalion,
516th Signal Brigade, 311th Signal Command

CAMP KENGUN, Japan – Each year, the U.S. Army and one of Japan Ground Self-Defense Force’s  five regional armies take part in a bilateral exercise called Yama Sakura.

This year, 516th Sig. Brigade, 311th Signal Command Soldiers converged in Kumamoto, located on Japan’s southernmost island, from the Pacific region to ensure YS 59 communications’ mission’s success.

Soldiers had an opportunity to work closely with their Japanese counterparts in every stage of exercise operations from standing up communications networks and wiring, to providing hands-on user training on Army Battle Command Systems.

Signal Soldiers were the first in and the last out. Two weeks prior to the exercise start, 78th Sig. Battalion, 516th Sig. Bde., was on the ground. Alongside their Japanese counterparts, U.S. Soldiers ran approximately 7,000 meters of cable to support services to more than 1,000 users.

Help desk operations combined efforts to ensure services were delivered and maintained successfully. Two help desks provided realistic and user-friendly interactions.

This was the first exercise that used live coalition network services as the primary network to participants. The Regional Computer Emergency Response Team and Tactical Network Team monitored all networks and provided situational awareness on the network status. The Information Assurance section and RCERT were critical to keeping the network secure.

YS 59 also offered its participants the opportunity to work side-by-side as close allies and build strong bonds. Warfighters had an opportunity to get to know their counterparts during a variety of activities, including visits to Kumamoto Castle and home visits.

During these trips, Soldiers learned about the Japanese culture. During socials, Soldiers had a chance to sit down after duty, relax and enjoy getting to know their Japanese Signal brethren.This allowed Soldiers from the U.S. and JGSDF to gain a better understanding of how each other’s jobs relates and how they differ.

There were multiple social opportunities for Soldiers from both militaries to exchange patches, insignia, rank, airborne wings and other special schools badges; Japanese soldiers consider these symbols as a form of adoration.

(Editor’s note: This article is a Hawaii Army Weekly web exclusive article.)

 

 

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Category: Exercises, News

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