FSC fuel handlers improve skill sets

| March 18, 2011 | 0 Comments
Sgt. Cordell Reese, FSC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., 8th TSC, places a sample of JP-8 to collect a flash point measurement at the Pearl Harbor Fuel Laboratory, on JBPHH.

Sgt. Cordell Reese, FSC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., 8th TSC, places a sample of JP-8 to collect a flash point measurement at the Pearl Harbor Fuel Laboratory, on JBPHH.

Story and Photos by
1st Lt. Brigida Sanchez
65th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command

 

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM — Armed with protective eyewear, latex gloves and a desire to learn, 14 Soldiers from the Forward Support Company, 65th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, focused on honing their skills as fuel lab technicians, recently.

The group, led by Staff Sgt. Myrick Lewis, FSC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., learned some of the intricacies of their trade during recent training at the Pearl Harbor Fuel Laboratory, here.

“We are here to expand the Soldiers’ skill-set, so they won’t be placed in a position in which they don’t know how to do their job,” Lewis said. “We appreciate the Pearl Harbor Fuel Lab for taking the time to help train our Soldiers.”

Soldiers from FSC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., 8th TSC, collect fuel samples for testing at the Pearl Harbor Fuel Laboratory on JBPHH.

Soldiers from FSC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., 8th TSC, collect fuel samples for testing at the Pearl Harbor Fuel Laboratory on JBPHH.

Daniel Muranaka, the laboratory’s head chemist, spent the morning training Soldiers to perform various tests on jet fuel, known as JP-8. He said understanding basic testing methods are essential for petroleum supply specialists.

A petroleum supply specialist is responsible for fuel reception, storage and shipping, and fueling and defueling vehicles and aircraft, according to Muranaka. They must be able to test fuel and take samples.

 

“If they have the knowledge of how important the tests are, and how important it is that the integrity of the fuel is not compromised, then it will give them a better awareness of how to properly take a sample,” Muranaka said. “So, when the data is produced, it is accurate, because decisions are made based upon that data, which is important to the success of the mission.”

For FSC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde. Soldiers, this training was a welcome opportunity to train on all aspects of their job.

“Because we are attached to an engineering unit, we usually don’t test fuels on a regular basis,” Lewis said. “But nine times out of 10, these Soldiers will move to an aviation unit or another unit that will require them to test the fuel, and I don’t want to handicap them. I want to prepare my Soldiers for the future, for their success.”

Less-experienced Soldiers, like Pvt. Antonio Plummer, FSC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., recognized the value of learning these lab procedures from start to finish. He said the lab concepts provided greater depth and understanding of the job nuances.

“I really enjoy doing military occupational specialty-related training,” Plummer said. “It makes me feel more confident about doing my job.”

That type of “know-how” is the goal of the unit’s MOS-focused “Sergeant’s Time” training, where noncommissioned officers train their troops and reinforce the skills needed to accomplish the unit’s mission.

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Category: News, Training

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