Engineers construct gazebo at Fisher House

| April 22, 2011 | 0 Comments
Soldiers from the 643rd Eng. Co., 84th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., 8th TSC, construct a gazebo at the Fisher House at Tripler Army Medical Center during March. (2nd Lt. Laura Beth Beebe | 84th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command)

Soldiers from the 643rd Eng. Co., 84th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., 8th TSC, construct a gazebo at the Fisher House at Tripler Army Medical Center during March. (2nd Lt. Laura Beth Beebe | 84th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command)

1st Lt. Amie Foster
84th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command

 

HONOLULU — Guests and volunteers at the Fisher House at Tripler Army Medical Center now have a gazebo to visit, thanks to the 643rd Engineer Company, 84th Eng. Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command.

The gazebo was officially opened April 12 for Fisher House volunteers and occupants to use.

Maj. Gen. Michael J. Terry, commander, 8th TSC; Lt. Col. James Horton, deputy brigade commander, 130th Eng. Bde.; Lt. Col. Jerry Farnsworth, commander, 84th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde.; Fisher House occupants; a small detachment from the 25th Infantry Division Band; and the Soldiers who built the gazebo attended the ceremony.

Theresa Johnson, manager, Fisher House, expressed her thanks during the ceremony for the gazebo that she had been wanting built for years.

“I didn’t realize how difficult it would be to have a gazebo built,” she said, “but thankfully, when I mentioned it to Gen. Terry, he told us it wouldn’t be a problem, that his engineers could get the job done.”

Soldiers of the 643rd Eng. Co., 84th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., finished the project sooner than expected, working through all types of weather.

“After three years of waiting for the project to get picked up by someone, the 643rd Engineers had it built in less than a month,” Johnson said.

The squad-level mission allowed each Soldier to exercise carpentry skills and to contribute to the project and directly interact with the project’s end users.

“The Soldiers really liked being part of a small crew because they were each able to use and showcase their skills during the project,” said Staff Sgt. Ronald Nelson, noncommissioned officer in charge of the project, who cut the lei-like ribbon with a pair of shears. “It really pays off when you know the project you are working on is making a difference in people’s everyday lives.”

TAMC certificates of appreciation and challenge coins were presented to the Soldiers.

The event also included a Hawaiian prayer dedication, song and hula.

Tags: , ,

Category: Army Community Covenant, Community

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *