307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn. comes home

| June 17, 2011 | 0 Comments
Sgt. Tim Flowers (right), 307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde., 311th Sig. Command, is welcomed home, June 5, by his wife, Tiffany, and their children, 17-month-old Tatiana (left) and 3-year-old Tayshaun, after a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan.

Sgt. Tim Flowers (right), 307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde., 311th Sig. Command, is welcomed home, June 5, by his wife, Tiffany, and their children, 17-month-old Tatiana (left) and 3-year-old Tayshaun, after a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan.

Story and Photos by
Staff Sgt. Crista Yazzie
311th Signal Command Public Affairs

HONOLULU — Accomplishing a communications mission from one location is hard enough, but providing command, control, communications and computer capabilities for two theaters from four separate locations is quite challenging.

Still, that is exactly what the 307th Expeditionary Signal Battalion, 516th Sig. Brigade, 311th Sig. Command, managed to accomplish during the past year.

More than 170 Soldiers assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company and Co. B, redeployed here, June 5, after a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan, where they provided communications support as part of Operation Enduring Freedom.

“It made the whole year worth it, (just) to see my family,” said Spc. Anthony Wooley, installations management operator, 307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde., whose wife and two children, ages 18 months and 7 years, greeted him at the welcome home ceremony. “Marching in and seeing them waiting for me and hugging them for the first time made all the stress and all the hard times downrange worth it.”

“These Soldiers did a phenomenal job,” said Lt. Col. Jacqueline Brown, commander, 307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde. “Not only did they prepare to deploy in 120 days, but we went out there as part of (OEF). What this means is between HHC and Co. B, they deployed to austere locations, to not-yet-established forward operating bases. So, they went in there and set up from scratch.”

While supporting OEF, the battalion split up and supported two regions in Afghanistan, simultaneously. HHC supported Regional Command in the northern Afghanistan, and Co. B deployed to the southern region of Afghanistan and headquartered in Kandahar.

“Their accomplishments have been monumental, and (this) says a lot about the Soldiers and their professionalism. They never quit,” Brown said. “If it was easy, they wouldn’t have sent us.”

Families of the 307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde., 311th Sig. Command, cheer as their Soldiers march into the room, after a year of separation. The 307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde., 311th Sig. Command, deployed to Afghanistan in support of OEF, the unit's first deployment since the Vietnam conflict.

Families of the 307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde., 311th Sig. Command, cheer as their Soldiers march into the room, after a year of separation. The 307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde., 311th Sig. Command, deployed to Afghanistan in support of OEF, the unit's first deployment since the Vietnam conflict.

The battalion established tactical communications for 16 newly-established FOBs, trained Afghan National Army soldiers on using communication equipment, built a computer laboratory to expedite training and established the largest Morale, Welfare and Recreation facility in the Regional Command-South.

While completing this mission in Afghanistan, the remainder of the battalion continued communication missions in the Pacific. The battalion is responsible for the Pacific’s tactical command, control, communications and computers capabilities.

“What the (307th Expeditionary Sig. Bn., 516th Sig. Bde.,) was able to accomplish with a modular structure was to deploy parts to Afghanistan while leaving other parts engaged in the theater, Alaska and Hawaii, and that is impressive,” said Brig. Gen. William Scott, commander, 311th Sig. Command.

Prior to the deployment, the battalion’s four companies supported USARPAC’s Theater Cooperation and Security Program, and during the deployment, Co. A and Co. C continued to support USARPAC’s signal needs. Co. A was attached to the 59th Sig. Bn. in Alaska, and Co. C. was attached to the 30th Sig. Bn., in Hawaii.

“It’s great to be home,” Brown said. “Now, we just have to continue to be professional. And while our mission is complete, as far as coming home from Afghanistan, it is not complete as part of the reintegration. So, the next 90 days (are) the most critical (mission), which is the Soldiers reintegrating.”

Tags: , ,

Category: News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *