USARPAC teams up with U.S. Coast Guard

| June 23, 2011 | 0 Comments
Marissa Bondaug (center), security officer, K Dock, discusses the procedures for an amphibious craft landing with members of the USARPAC CCP’s DAT during the Makani Pahili hurricane exercise on the Big Island, recently.(Courtesy of U.S. Army-Pacific)

Marissa Bondaug (center), security officer, K Dock, discusses the procedures for an amphibious craft landing with members of the USARPAC CCP’s DAT during the Makani Pahili hurricane exercise on the Big Island, recently.(Courtesy of U.S. Army-Pacific)

Lt. Col. Al Hing
U.S. Army-Pacific Contingency Command Post
Public Affairs

FORT SHAFTER — The U.S. Army-Pacific Contingency Command Post’s Deployable Assessment Team performed a joint task force, disaster-response operation during exercise Makani Pahili 2011, here, recently.

Makani Pahili, or strong winds, is the State of Hawaii’s hurricane readiness exercise.

The USARPAC CCP’s DAT demonstrated its ability to rapidly deploy to a natural disaster site in the Pacific, while providing command and control support to federal, military, state and local agencies’ disaster-relief efforts.

Consisting of nine to 23 Soldiers, the DAT is flexible to tailor to mission requirements and deploys with mission-essential equipment through military or commercial aircraft.

A U.S. Coast Guard C-130 Hercules aircraft provided transportation for the DAT team and equipment. The Coast Guard’s enthusiasm to transport the DAT team to the site reflected the exercises’ joint cooperation.

“We do missions around the world all the time; it was great to do a transport mission involving a different service,” said Lt. j.g. Dustin Burton, assistant training officer, U.S. Coast Guard. “The Coast Guard’s C-130s’ normal day-to-day mission is long-range search and rescue, with some drug-enforcement missions.”

“This was a first, to work with the U.S. Coast Guard, (while) validating our load plans and transport in a C-130,” said Col. Marlin Remigio, maneuver director, USARPAC CCP.

During disaster-relief missions, the C-130 is crucial, as it can reach remote and underdeveloped airstrips that are untouchable by larger aircraft. Instead of waiting for other airstrips to become available, the DAT can reach the affected areas faster and start the relief coordination process quicker during the critical moments after a natural disaster.

“It isn’t a case of ‘if’ the next natural disaster will happen; it is a question of ‘when’ it will happen in the Pacific,” Remigio said.

 

Tags: , , ,

Category: Exercises, News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *