65th Eng. Bn.’s HHC trained, ready for CBRN attacks

| July 7, 2011 | 0 Comments
Sgt. Eddie Newman, HHC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., 8th TSC, learns how to calculate the fallout radius of a CBRN attack during “Sergeant’s Time Training,” recently, at Area X, Schofield Barracks.

Sgt. Eddie Newman, HHC, 65th Eng. Bn., 130th Eng. Bde., 8th TSC, learns how to calculate the fallout radius of a CBRN attack during “Sergeant’s Time Training,” recently, at Area X, Schofield Barracks.

Story and Photo by
2nd Lt. Kyle Suchomski
65th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — “If a chemical attack happens here,” asked Sgt. Jason Weaver, as he pointed to a spot on the map, “how far will the fallout travel in two hours?”

On cue, Soldiers from Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 65th Engineer Battalion, 130th Eng. Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, broke out their compasses and began calculating the fallout radius.

These Soldiers learned about chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear hazards during three weeks of “Sergeant’s Time Training.” The training then culminated with a gas chamber exercise, where Soldiers learned to trust in their CBRN protective equipment.

“If there are chemicals in the air, you’re going to know it,” said Spc. Tyler Steele, operations, 65th Eng. Bn. “Being trained to detect and react to the chemicals can save our lives. This block of training has made us all a little more confident in our detection equipment.”

Although the majority of these Soldiers are engineers, the training they receive is critical.

“I learned how and when to send up a situation report, which would keep others from being contaminated,” said Spc. Robert Workman, armorer, HHC, who added that he now feels more prepared to react to a CBRN situation.

Although the CRBN threat has been diminished, the danger of such weapons remains a significant concern.

Sgt. Isaac Degracia, supply sergeant, HHC, emphasized the importance of keeping a clear head during a CBRN attack, and how composure is necessary for “clear communication and … maintaining the tactical position.”

Leaders know this composure comes from Soldiers being familiar with their equipment and proficient in their ability to employ CBRN gear.

“A chemical or biological attack is always a possibility,” Weaver said, CBRN trainer, HHC. “It could turn into a really dangerous situation really quickly.

“What we’re teaching, here, gives Soldiers the confidence to get the mission accomplished and might even save their lives,” he said.

 

 

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