Warrior Ohana clinic opens to families, retirees

| December 16, 2011 | 0 Comments

Pacific Regional Medical Command
Public Affairs Office

Care coordinators Divina Richardson (right) and Yolanda Richardson, both licensed practical nurses, manage the front desk at the Warrior Ohana Medical Home, recently. (Aiko Brum | U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

Care coordinators Divina Richardson (right) and Yolanda Richardson, both licensed practical nurses, manage the front desk at the Warrior Ohana Medical Home, recently. (Aiko Brum | U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

KALAELOA — It’s no secret why patients love the Warrior Ohana Medical Home, or WOMH, a community-based primary care clinic, here.

At its heart, the WOMH is health care the way it should be – easy to access, patient centered, team based and quality focused. It’s one of 21 community-based medical home clinics located throughout the continental U.S. and Hawaii.

Community-based medical homes are Army-run primary care clinics, located off post in communities where Army families live. The clinics are inspired by patients’ ideas and suggestions about how health care should be. This concept of patient-centered health care is being adopted across both military and civilian health care systems.

For Jeanette Ayala, a Navy spouse whose husband is assigned to the USS Chosen, making the switch was a no-brainer. The year has been one of changes; Ayala and her husband moved here from Japan in March, and in July, their son Stephan was born.

“My family lives in Kalaeloa, so it’s really convenient,” she said, “but what I really like is the idea behind the medical home. It feels like I’m in my hometown clinic with one doctor for the entire family. I feel like the level of care is better because they know me better.”

Each patient has a team of doctors and nurses who work with that patient to promote a spirit of health and wellness.

“We went to the clinic to kind of try it out, and the decision to switch was made almost immediately,” Ayala said. “Everyone from the front desk personnel to the nurses to the doctor were patient and took the time to answer every question. They wanted to make sure we were knowledgeable about everything related to our care. You could just tell everyone enjoyed their job, cared about you and your well-being.”

To better serve patients, the WOMH partnered with the Armed Services YMCA to operate a Keiki Waiting Room, a no-cost child care center for children ages 6 weeks-12 years old, in August.

“Patients expressed to me many times that this is a service they are accustomed to at both Schofield Barracks Health Clinic and Tripler Army Medical Center,” said Mary Nilges, group practice manager, WOMH. “(Our patients) have told me they would really appreciate it if we could have a waiting room, here, also. It is a much-needed service.”

Warrior Ohana Medical Home

Enrollment is open to families of active duty service members and retirees; however, retirees must have Tricare Prime coverage and be under age 64.

To enroll, family members should visit the nearest Tricare Service Center. Offices are located on both the Hickam and Pearl Harbor sides of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, at Schofield Barracks Health Center and at TAMC.

Call (888) 874-9378. Service centers are open Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

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