Tripler Army Medical Center rings in the new year with Hawaii’s first baby

| January 5, 2012 | 0 Comments
Brig. Gen. Keith Gallagher (right), commander, Pacific Regional Medical Command and TAMC, holds Faith Erin Fielden, Hawaii’s New Year’s baby, while parents Capt. Aaron Fielden and Erin look on. Faith was born Jan. 1, at 12:02 a.m., weighing in at 7 pounds, 2 ounces, and measuring 20 and a half inches long. (Jan Clark | Tripler Army Medical Center Public Affairs)

Brig. Gen. Keith Gallagher (right), commander, Pacific Regional Medical Command and TAMC, holds Faith Erin Fielden, Hawaii’s New Year’s baby, while parents Capt. Aaron Fielden and Erin look on. Faith was born Jan. 1, at 12:02 a.m., weighing in at 7 pounds, 2 ounces, and measuring 20 and a half inches long. (Jan Clark | Tripler Army Medical Center Public Affairs)

Stephanie Bryant
Tripler Army Medical Center Public Affairs

HONOLULU — Each new year, the hospitals in Hawaii wait in anticipation to see where the first baby of the year will be born.

The friendly, informal competition adds a little bit more excitement for the staff working at the facilities, said Capt. Suzanne Cobleigh, assistant clinical nurse and officer in charge for Labor and Delivery, Tripler Army Medical Center, here.

This year, TAMC welcomed the first bundle of joy for 2012.

“Having the New Year’s baby is a great reminder for our staff of why it is we do what we do,” Cobleigh said. “We bring life into this world, and who can think of a better way to ring in the new year?”

Faith Erin Fielden was born Jan. 1, at 12:02 a.m., weighing in at 7 pounds, 2 ounces, and measuring in at 20 and a half inches long.

Her parents, Capt. Aaron Fielden and wife, Erin, couldn’t be more happy or proud.

“We were both very anxious,” the captain said. “The timing worked out really well, and the staff has been really great. They have taken good care of all of us.”

Faith was due to arrive around Jan. 18, but Erin suffered from pre-eclampsia at 29 weeks and spent the rest of 2011 on bed rest. Pre-eclampsia is a syndrome that causes high blood pressure and excess protein in the urine after 20 weeks of pregnancy in a woman who previously had normal blood pressure, and it can cause many complications for mother and baby before, during and after pregnancy.

Mother and baby are doing well and were released Jan. 2.

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