25th ID remembers legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

| January 26, 2012 | 0 Comments
Sgt. Savannah Hyatt (right), combat medic, Co. C, 225th BSB, 2nd BCT, 25th ID, recites Maya Angelou’s “Still I Rise,” in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Jan. 17.

Sgt. Savannah Hyatt (right), combat medic, Co. C, 225th BSB, 2nd BCT, 25th ID, recites Maya Angelou’s “Still I Rise,” in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Jan. 17.

Story and Photo by
Sgt. Daniel K. Johnson
2nd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs,25th Infantry Division

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers, family members and friends of the 25th Infantry Division gathered at the Martinez Gym, here, to recall the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a remembrance ceremony, Jan. 17.

“It was a privilege for the 2nd Brigade Combat Team to host an event honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy of justice, equality and service to one another, all of which are in line with our Army values,” said Maj. Michelle Toyofuku, air defense artillery officer, 2nd BCT.

The observance began with an invocation and singing of the national anthem. Cpl. Sawyer Stubbe, 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd BCT, then read the 2012 Presidential Proclamation of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday

In the proclamation, President Barrack Obama wrote, “Today, Dr. King is memorialized in the National Mall where he once spoke, a symbol of how far our nation has come and a testament to the quiet heroes whose names may never appear in history books, but whose selflessness brought about change few thought possible.”

“His example stirred men and women of all backgrounds to become foot soldiers for justice, and his leadership gave them the courage to refuse the limitations of the day and fight for the prospect of tomorrow,” Stubbe said.

“At the age of 35, Dr. King was the youngest man to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end racial segregation and discrimination through civil disobedience and other nonviolent means.”

Sgt. Savannah Hyatt, Company C, 225th Bde. Support Battalion, 2nd BCT, echoed the sentiment with her rendition of Maya Angelou’s “Still I Rise.”

The poem stresses the importance of strength in everyday life, an ideal very important in today’s military, both deployed and at home.

Following Hyatt’s rendition, Chaplain (Capt.) Terrell Byred, 225th BSB, read Dr. King’s 1964 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Before concluding the observance, Spc. Marissa Flanigan-Lee, 2nd Bn., 11th Field Artillery Regiment, delivered a moving rendition of “His Eyes on the Sparrow.”

“Let us remember Dr. King’s legacy by honoring our fellow man with service each and every day. Let us devote our free time to helping someone in need,” Stubbe said. “Let us continue to lift each other up as Dr. King wanted.”

 

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Category: News, Observances

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