USARPAC builds partnerships one NCO at a time

| March 9, 2012 | 0 Comments
1st Sgt. Frank Salajcik (left), commandant of the NCO Academy, and Command Sgt. Major Frank Leota (middle), senior enlisted leader, USARPAC, speaks to Pvt. Sean Spivey (top right) and Pvt. Kieran Manaena , both with the New Zealand army, Feb. 22, about the importance of the Army's NCO and Warrior Leader courses.

1st Sgt. Frank Salajcik (left), commandant of the NCO Academy, and Command Sgt. Major Frank Leota (middle), senior enlisted leader, USARPAC, speaks to Pvt. Sean Spivey (top right) and Pvt. Kieran Manaena , both with the New Zealand army, Feb. 22, about the importance of the Army's NCO and Warrior Leader courses.

Story and Photo by
Staff Sgt. Cashmere C. Jefferson
U.S. Army-Pacific Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers from the New Zealand army attended the Warrior Leader Course, here, Feb. 1-24.

WLC trains prospective and newly promoted sergeants of the active and reserve components in basic leadership skills on noncommissioned officer duties and responsibilities. Sergeants learn about the authority of NCOs and how to conduct basic warrior tasks and battle drills.

Wearing the rank equivalent to Army sergeants, Pvt. Sean Spivey, an infantryman, and Pvt. Kieran Manaena, supply technician, both with New Zealand army, joined the Army’s future NCOs in training at the invitation of Command Sgt. Maj. Frank Leota, senior enlisted leader, U.S. Army-Pacific.

Leota visited the New Zealand army soldiers during their field training exercise, Feb. 22, to talk about their experiences during the course and to give the soldiers a better understanding of the importance of developing the NCO Corps.

“We don’t teach sergeants; we refine them,” Leota said. “We refine what these sergeants have already been trained and developed on everyday and ensure that we haven’t skipped a beat.”

As an example of NCO development, Leota explained that technology used at the NCO Academy was a great part of the educational program, but emphasized “sergeants train sergeants.” When equipment fails, he said, it is the responsibility of the NCO to get “back to the basics.”

Spivey and Manaena both agreed that what they experienced at WLC is “way” different from the way they train at home. They said they will take a lot of what they learned with them to share with their soldiers; in particular Army leadership, drills, ceremonies and military customs and courtesies.

“Everyone is a lot more formal when talking to NCOs,” Spivey said. “We have a lot more freedom where I come from when we talk to each other. I’m impressed by the respect shown here.”

Unlike the workday of an American Soldier, Spivey said his days are not so long.

“I’m not used to waking up at 4 a.m., that’s for sure,” Manaena said. “I’ve learned a lot from my squad members, and the instructors are pretty good. It’s a big change, but a good change, and everyone helps me along the way.”

“The future of the Pacific relies on the partnerships and friendships,” Leota said. “Junior leaders are empowered with the authority, autonomy and responsibility that they will take on as NCOs.

“As the USARPAC command sergeant major,” he added, “I will continue to ask and request international students to attend WLC to expose them to the way we train and develop the future leaders of our Army.”

 

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