USARPAC gets a look at Army’s new radio systems

| April 6, 2012 | 0 Comments
Mary Dixon and Chief Warrant Officer 4 Fernando Perez, both from USARPAC G6, view a smartphone display during the Joint Program Executive Office for the Joint Tactical Radio System’s demonstrations on the Handheld Manpack and Rifleman Radio, March 22, at Fort Shafter Flats. (Courtesy Photo)

Mary Dixon and Chief Warrant Officer 4 Fernando Perez, both from USARPAC G6, view a smartphone display during the Joint Program Executive Office for the Joint Tactical Radio System’s demonstrations on the Handheld Manpack and Rifleman Radio, March 22, at Fort Shafter Flats. (Courtesy Photo)

U.S. Army-Pacific
Public Affairs Office

Joint Program Executive Office demonstrates latest tool in communication

FORT SHAFTER — Two new radio systems were demonstrated, here, March 22.

The Joint Program Executive Office for the Joint Tactical Radio System gave demonstrations on two systems, the Handheld Manpack and the Rifleman Radio, here, March 22.

“I want everyone to understand that this is very real,” said Brig. Gen. Michael Williamson, Joint Program Executive Office for the Joint Tactical Radio System.

“What you have is advanced networking waveforms (radio systems) and some very sophisticated hardware bringing newcapabilities to our warfighters,” Williamson said.

Col. Raymond Jones, assistant program manager, Joint Tactical Radio System, gave a presentation before the live demonstration of the radio systems.

During the first part of the demonstration, Lt. Col. Mark Stiner, product manager, Joint Program Executive Office, divided attendees into two simulated groups to get hands-on experience.

“Every Rifleman Radio is a relay, voice and data network. This is the first acquisition program designed to give every Soldier in formation a radio,” Stiner said.

The Rifleman radios act as relays by allowing two radios that are not in the line of sight to communicate, Stiner said.

Also, Rifleman radios will use Bluetooth capabilities to visually locate all users connected to the network.

“The technology will be welcomed by units that maneuver, and it cuts down on relaying info,” said Mary Dixon, communications planner, U.S. Army-Pacific.

Next, Stiner covered the Manpack Radio and how it expands the capabilities of the Rifleman Radio.

The Manpack Radio connects with legacy and network radios (multiple communication systems) on one channel; the other channel can connects with the Rifleman Radio, Stiner said.

The systems have mounted and dismounted capabilities.

“I like the capability to bridge two systems and beyond line-of-sight communications,” Dixon said.

Williamson’s team demonstrated how to connect from Fort Shafter Flats to Fort Shafter by sending his staff members over with a Manpack Radio to Fort Shafter.

The movement was tracked via smartphone.

Within minutes, a connection was made with the Rifleman radios located in the housing area, here, and they instantly became part of the network.

Stiner also demonstrated the Manpack’s satellite capability.

Using the Rifleman Radio, Stiner had his Manpack connect to Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, via satellite.

“It is very exciting seeing the technologies we talked about 13 years ago,” said Marine Maj. Steve Monsour, MCBH. “I am also impressed with the ease of operation.”

 

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