18th MEDCOM sharpens skills, prepares National Guard

| May 4, 2012 | 0 Comments
During intense lane training, 2nd Lt. Patrick Savelio (left), medical operations officer; Sgt. Alfredo Colon (center), internal control analyst; and Sgt. Laquanda Rainey, executive administrative assistant, all with 18th MEDCOM (DS), prepare a simulated casualty for evacuation from a combat zone during the unit’s lane training exercise at Schofield Barracks, April 13-18.

During intense lane training, 2nd Lt. Patrick Savelio (left), medical operations officer; Sgt. Alfredo Colon (center), internal control analyst; and Sgt. Laquanda Rainey, executive administrative assistant, all with 18th MEDCOM (DS), prepare a simulated casualty for evacuation from a combat zone during the unit’s lane training exercise at Schofield Barracks, April 13-18.

Story and Photos by
Sgt. 1st Class Rodney Jackson
18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) conducted its annual lane training exercise, here, April 13-18 — with a twist.

The 18th MEDCOM polishes its skills every year on all skill level one tasks and range qualifications. Every year, the training culminates with Soldiers navigating lanes in squads to test the level of comprehension each has accomplished throughout the days prior.

This year, however, as the 18th MEDCOM set up operations at Area X, here, a Hawaii Army National Guard Public Affairs Detachment set up in an adjacent building. When the 18th MEDCOM moved out to its lane training scenarios, the HIANG video broadcast team followed.

Spc. Stephanie Usita (right), broadcast journalist, HIANG, records Spc. David Goins (left), paralegal, and Sgt. Tia Wilson (center), unit administrator, both with 18th MEDCOM (DS), searching Staff Sgt. James McKee, food services operations manager, 18th MEDCOM (DS), acting as an insurgent during the unit’s lane training exercise at Schofield Barracks, April 13-18.

Spc. Stephanie Usita (right), broadcast journalist, HIANG, records Spc. David Goins (left), paralegal, and Sgt. Tia Wilson (center), unit administrator, both with 18th MEDCOM (DS), searching Staff Sgt. James McKee, food services operations manager, 18th MEDCOM (DS), acting as an insurgent during the unit’s lane training exercise at Schofield Barracks, April 13-18.

Tasked by a U.S. Army-Pacific Public Affairs trainer, this change-up allowed the unit to record its lanes training as a practice exercise that will prepare the team for covering units in theater.

18th MEDCOM Soldiers pushed through three lanes. The first was a medical lane during which Soldiers rescued simulated casualties and evacuated them to a medical evacuation point. This lane was combined with a checkpoint lane to stop and search a vehicle and its occupants.

At the second lane, Soldiers faced an improvised explosive device with the task to maneuver through a village after an IED attack. The final lane put the unit face-to-face with a mock village lane; the mission was to receive information from a sheik, while an unexpected ambush awaited.

“This year’s training was different from last years,” said Spc. David Goins, paralegal, 18th MEDCOM (DS). “I felt more

involved everyday, and we learned from personnel with different leadership styles, (who) were deployed and not deployed, to work as a group during combat operations.”

The task to record the lanes training by the HIANG was the unit’s first chance to actually record Soldiers doing their job.

Sgt. Charlie Abrego, human resources specialist, 18th MEDCOM (DS), pulls guard while fellow Soldiers evacuate a simulated casualty from the combat zone, during the unit’s lane training exercise.

Sgt. Charlie Abrego, human resources specialist, 18th MEDCOM (DS), pulls guard while fellow Soldiers evacuate a simulated casualty from the combat zone, during the unit’s lane training exercise.

“The unit’s initial real-world training allowed the team to produce its first newscast, to its capabilities, from skills acquired before the training from USARPAC,” said Spc. Stephanie Usita, broadcast journalist, HIANG. “Our leadership did an excellent job by providing us this training. If we wouldn’t have gotten the training, we would have been set up for failure.”

Usita went on to say how the training gave her the chance to get familiar with the unit’s new equipment and how the unit will be well prepared to do its jobs, because “there won’t be anyone there holding our hands.”

“The training was designed to build on what the Soldiers learned in advanced individual training public affairs training,” said Staff Sgt. Robert Ham, broadcast journalist, USARPAC Public Affairs.

Ham added that the training helped “expand their knowledge” and made them “ready for the deployment.”

“I saw improvement and implementation of the classroom instruction after only one week,” Ham said.

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Category: News, Training

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