Pilot program to open new MOS’s to female Soldiers

| May 12, 2012 | 0 Comments
Sgt. Mahlet Tesfaye, 25th ID, salutes during a formation, recently. The Army will begin a six-month assessment of the DGCAR rule for female Soldiers. (Courtesy of 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

Sgt. Mahlet Tesfaye, 25th ID, salutes during a formation, recently. The Army will begin a six-month assessment of the DGCAR rule for female Soldiers. (Courtesy of 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

Rob McIlvaine
Army News Service

WASHINGTON — The Army announced April 27 that it will begin a six-month assessment, May 14, of an exception to the Direct Ground Combat Assignment Rule for female Soldiers.

Under DGCAR, six military occupational specialties, or MOSs, were previously closed to women because they were normally co-located with direct combat units.

The Army’s removal of “co-location” from its policy will open six specialties in 80 units to females, down to the battalion level, said Brig. Gen. Barrye Price, director, Human Resources Policy. “With the removal of co-location, a little over 13,000 billets will open for women to compete for assignment. Now, for the first time, women will be allowed to assess into these six specialties.

“We’ll have to actually now recruit women for these specialties, which they have not in the past,” he added.

Under the exception to policy, Price said 10 officer specialties and more enlisted positions will also be open to women in nine brigade combat teams across the Army.

“We’re going to look to execute this exception to policy at one brigade at Fort Carson, Colo.; three brigades at Fort Hood, Texas; one brigade at Fort Knox, Ky.; one brigade at Fort Drum, N.Y.; one brigade at Fort Campbell, Ky.; and two brigade combat teams in Hawaii,” Price said.

Within each of those brigades, Price continued, the Army already has women serving at the brigade headquarters level, but within those nine brigades are 37 battalions in which women have not served before.

“This war, more than any, has shaped and informed our views on opening the aperture for women, based on what they’re actually doing, what they’ve actually achieved,” Price said. “Our nation and, historically, the roles that we’ve seen women playing and performing … I think that really 11 years of persistent conflict has really shaped our views, not just internally to the Department of Defense, but also societal views, as what more pronounced role women may play.”

The exception to DGCAR opens select positions to women in direct combat units at the battalion level in a number of MOSs, totaling about 755 Army positions across nine BCTs. Company grade officers in the ranks of second lieutenant through captain and noncommissioned officers in the grades of sergeant to sergeant first class will be receiving orders and will report for duty May 14.

The DOD’s intent to implement the exception to policy was first announced in the DOD Women in the Services Restrictions Review released in February.

The Army will assess the impact of this exception to policy over a six-month period, Price said, and provide a joint-service report with the assessment period results and corresponding recommendations to the secretary of Defense in November.

The Army intends to begin executing those recommendations shortly thereafter, he said.

“This has been a great growth experience for our nation at large,” Price said.

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Category: Army News Service, News

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