Volunteers needed to tackle, track trash at Kaena Point

| August 31, 2012 | 0 Comments
Spc. Rowena Napoles, with 311th Signal Command, hefts trash from the shoreline of Kaena Point State Park. Napoles and other Soldiers supported a joint Army, Department of Land and Natural Resources Earth Month restoration at Kaena Point State Park, April 28. (Photo by Stefanie Gardin | U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii)

Spc. Rowena Napoles, with 311th Signal Command, hefts trash from the shoreline of Kaena Point State Park. Napoles and other Soldiers supported a joint Army, Department of Land and Natural Resources Earth Month restoration at Kaena Point State Park, April 28. (Photo by Stefanie Gardin | U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

Amy Bugala
U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers, family members and Department of the Army civilians are needed to help “tackle and track” trash at Kaena Point State Park Reserve and Army Beach, Sept. 15, 8-11:30 a.m.

The Army community is being asked to join hands with volunteers from around the world to collect trash and marine debris, as part of the 27th Annual International Coastal Cleanup, or ICC, at Kaena Point and Army Beach.

What’s collected will be recorded as part of the one-day global-collection effort.

“Trash doesn’t just appear on its own — people leave it behind,” said Col. Daniel Whitney, commander, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii.

Spc. Erick Olson, with 225th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, picks up a wooden palette near the shore during a clean-up effort. Olson and other Soldiers volunteered as part of a joint Army,  Hawaii DLNR Earth Month restoration at Kaena Point State Park, April 28. (Photo by Stefanie Gardin | U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

Spc. Erick Olson, with 225th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, picks up a wooden palette near the shore during a clean-up effort. Olson and other Soldiers volunteered as part of a joint Army, Hawaii DLNR Earth Month restoration at Kaena Point State Park, April 28. (Photo by Stefanie Gardin | U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

“This event is a great opportunity for our Soldiers and families to continue the momentum gained from our recent joint Earth Day restoration effort at Kaena Point,” Whitney said. “It’s a chance to help give back and support our local community.”

This beach cleanup is part of an international action started by the Ocean Conservancy, which has been “tracking the trash” for the past 26 years. Organizers say the difference between the ICC and other beach cleanups is the data collection process.

Volunteers log items found on standardized data cards, which list 43 commonly found items, such as cigarette butts, plastic bottles, bags, caps and lids, and fishing line. The data provides a unique global picture of the long-term trash trends and inspires changes, from product design to disposal, that better protect the ocean and wildlife.

The Kaena Point State Park Reserve is located at the end of Farrington Highway (Highway 930). It is approximately 10 miles west of Waialua on the North Shore/Mokuleia side of Kaena Point.

This local effort is supported by the Friends of Kaena Point, the National Park Service, Kokua Hawaii Foundation and the State of Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources’ Division of Forestry and Wildlife.

• Kaena Point Volunteer Support

Army units or civilians interested in volunteering must register by calling the USAG-HI Public Affairs Office at (808) 656-3158/3160 or by emailing amy.bugala@us.army.mil by Sept. 10.

Sturdy shoes, hats and sunscreen are strongly recommended. Soldiers should wear military-affiliated attire or unit T-shirts.

Water, trash bags and limited gloves will be available. Volunteers are encouraged to bring their own gloves, if they have them.

Volunteers should also bring refillable water bottles.

Pets are not allowed at the park.

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Category: Army Community Covenant, Community, Community Relations, Native Hawaiian Community Program, Safety, Sustainability

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