94th AAMDC sergeant motivates physical fitness

| November 19, 2012 | 0 Comments
Staff Sgt. George Torres (right), training room noncommissioned officer in charge, 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command, provides motivation to a Soldier to stay fit as part of the 94th AAMDC's Army physical fitness remedial training program, recently.

Staff Sgt. George Torres (right), training room noncommissioned officer in charge, 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command, provides motivation to a Soldier to stay fit as part of the 94th AAMDC’s Army physical fitness remedial training program, recently.

Story and photo by
Sgt. Louis Lamar
94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command Public Affairs

FORT SHAFTER — Physical fitness has always been a top priority for the U.S. military.

The 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command’s Army physical fitness remedial training program helps Soldiers who do not meet the standards for physical readiness and weight control.

Ensuring that all Soldiers stay physically fit in accordance with Army Regulation 600-9 is not only a task for first-line supervisors, but also a responsibility that falls on each individual Soldier.

“I think that the Army physical fitness remedial training program is a good program for Soldiers that need the extra help,” said Pfc. Patrick Ross, 94th AAMDC mechanic. “The program is very challenging and helpful if you apply yourself and work hard.”

Soldiers are entered into remedial training if they have been referred by the command due to failures in their Army physical fitness tests, height and weight standards, body fat content standards and/or acceptable appearance in uniform, said Staff Sgt. George Torres, 94th AAMDC’s training room noncommissioned officer in charge. Soldiers can also self-refer themselves for improvement on physical fitness and weight, he said.

“The … remedial training program is custom-fitted to the area of fitness that the enrolled Soldiers are lacking in or where they need improvement in,” said Torres. “We also incorporate daily exercises that target the upper-body, lower-body and cardio fitness.

“Once command referred into the program, this is a mandatory place of duty,” said Torres. “Soldiers have to go see a nutritionist and a doctor to get lab work done to make sure there are no underlying medical issues. If a Soldier comes off the program and has to be enrolled again, within less than a year, the Soldier can possibly face a chapter separation from the military.

“Promotions, schools, re-enlistments, self appearance and other favorable actions are some of the tools used to motivate Soldiers to get off of the program and stay off,” Torres added. “This program has motivated enrolled Soldiers to work out on weekends to improve themselves. It has also improved their self esteem.”

“I love to work out, so that motivates me to push myself while training,” said Ross.

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Category: Community, Fitness, Health

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