Evenly matched squads wage ‘Three-Day War’

| December 1, 2012 | 1 Comment
Spc. Timothy Adams (right) points out possible enemy targets to Pvt. Rodrigo Jimenez during a realistic squad vs. squad “Three Day War” exercise, Nov.15. Both “Wolfhounds” are in Co. A, 2nd Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., 3rd BCT, 25th ID.

Spc. Timothy Adams (right) points out possible enemy targets to Pvt. Rodrigo Jimenez during a realistic squad vs. squad “Three Day War” exercise, Nov.15. Both “Wolfhounds” are in Co. A, 2nd Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., 3rd BCT, 25th ID.

Story and photos by
Sgt. Hillary Rustine
3rd Brigade Combat Team
25th Infantry Division Public Affairs

KAHUKU TRAINING AREA — Looking out over the breathtaking view from a mountainside on Oahu, they received the word: “You’re all dead!”

Straining their eyes, the squad had to decipher if the swaying of the trees was the breeze or Soldiers silently approaching through the treacherous territory.

Warriors of 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, conducted a “Three-Day War,”a squad force-on-force training exercise, Nov. 13-16.

“The event is designed to evaluate the squad leader’s ability to synchronize the actions of his fire teams, operate within the commander’s intent and dynamically adapt to unforeseen circumstances,” said Capt. Jonathan Leiter, Plans, 2-27th Inf. Regt., 3rd BCT.

The squads executed two missions per day, lasting two hours each, with each company in the battalion rotating squads during the three days to every station, for more diversified training. During periods of darkness, squads conducted patrol -based activities to train for low-light and uneven landscape patrols.

“Squad leaders are receiving the same mission, and briefed that the opposing squad is the enemy. Each lane consisted of looking for high-value targets, downed military equipment or captured personnel, and recovering them,” said Spc. Mark Pulver, gun team, Company C, 2-27th Inf. Regt. “This is to test each squad leader for creativity, ingenuity … and allows squad leaders to direct their team leaders to accomplish the mission.”

Staff Sgt. Benjamin George (left) and Spc. Wyatt Arndt, both from Company A, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Inf. Division, make their way to the objective during the Wolfhound Squad vs. Squad Three Day War, here, Nov. 15.

Staff Sgt. Benjamin George (left) and Spc. Wyatt Arndt, both from Co. A, 2-27th, 3rd BC Team, 25th ID, make their way to the objective during the Wolfhound Squad vs. Squad Three Day War, Nov. 15.

The goal was to put squad leaders in positions to make decisions that they normally wouldn’t in a training situation. These decisions have real consequences opposite a live force that is equal or greater than their number with similar training and resources.

“It’s fun because we get to play against each other. It’s like capture the flag; whoever gets the objective first wins,” said Pulver.

According to most of the participants, the hardest part was the terrain. The challenges were staying several days on a mountain while wearing gear the entire time, negotiating the steep mountainsides and reacting to contact in that environment.

Simultaneously, the battalion’s reconnaissance platoon conducted a three-day zone reconnaissance exercise focused on locating and determining the composition and capabilities of the squads.

“I think it’s good training; it gives me more confidence because I am learning to traverse the terrain and deal with the weather,” said Pfc. Nathan Morrison, Co. C.

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Category: News, Training

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  1. Jill marie adams says:

    There is no one in the world like T.J. He is the best at everything he touches!

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