CAB certifies KAW flight medics

| December 7, 2012 | 0 Comments
Staff Sgt. Miguel Valdez (right), flight medic, Co. C, 3rd Bn., 25th Avn. Regt.,"Task Force Hammerhead," 25th CAB, oversees Afghan Sgt. Fazal Haq Maftoon, flight medic, Kandahar Air Wing, as he performs his initial assessment on a simulated patient as part of his final test.

Staff Sgt. Miguel Valdez (right), flight medic, Co. C, 3rd Bn., 25th Avn. Regt.,”Task Force Hammerhead,” 25th CAB, oversees Afghan Sgt. Fazal Haq Maftoon, flight medic, Kandahar Air Wing, as he performs his initial assessment on a simulated patient as part of his final test.

Story and photos by Sgt. Daniel Schroeder
25th Combat Aviation Brigade Public Affairs

KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan — Medics of the Kandahar Air Wing were certified during flight medic training with Company C, 3rd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, Task Force Hammerhead, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, Nov. 28.

KAW flight medics learned how to receive a 9-line medevac request and perform necessary treatment on a casualty. The KAW is an element of the Afghan air force providing aviation support to Afghan forces in southern Afghanistan.

Afghan soldiers practice loading a patient into a UH-60 Black Hawk at Kandahar Airfield.

Afghan soldiers practice loading a patient into a UH-60 Black Hawk at Kandahar Airfield.

“The training is great for us to have,” said Afghan Sgt. Fazal Haq Maftoon, a flight medic with the KAW. “I learned a lot that I did not know before. The patient assessment is the biggest part of being a flight medic.”

To date, flight medics from C/3-25th Avn. have trained 15 KAW flight medics. The Afghan soldiers conducted medical and trauma assessments, basic life-support procedures and combat lifesaver tactics.

“The most important thing for a health care provider is the assessment of a patient,” said Staff Sgt. Miguel Valdez, a flight medic assigned to C/3-25th Avn. “The training has evolved from having the flight medics learn flight medic procedures to treating patients on a real-time medevac call.”

Afghan flight medics completed an in-flight scenario. They received two simulated casualties and provided necessary care during transport to the nearest medical facility.

“The goal of the training is to teach them to be able to provide critical care to a patient in transit and to develop an assessment rhythm,” said Valdez. “Once you develop a rhythm, you will not miss anything … making you a better health care provider.”

 

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