YIR: Garrison focuses on people, safety in 2012

| January 11, 2013 | 0 Comments
(From left) Col. Daniel Whitney, commander, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, comments on the signing of a memorandum of understanding pledging closer collaboration between the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard and the city on sustainability and solid waste management issues, as former City and County of Honolulu Mayor Peter Carlisle and Capt. Jeffrey James, commander, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, listen in at a ceremony at the mayor's office, here, Nov. 15. (Jack Wiers | U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

HONOLULU — (From left) Col. Daniel Whitney, commander, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, comments on the signing of a memorandum of understanding pledging closer collaboration between the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard and the city on sustainability and solid waste management issues, as former City and County of Honolulu Mayor Peter Carlisle and Capt. Jeffrey James, commander, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, listen in at a ceremony at the mayor’s office, here, Nov. 15. (Jack Wiers | U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

Aiko Rose Brum
Chief, Internal Communication, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii

2012 YIRWHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD — For U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, personnel reductions, construction and traffic woes, and recurring community issues, such as safety, utility bills and speeding on post, fully engaged and challenged directorates in 2012.

Yet, despite these challenges, the garrison remained focused on its customers, facilities and infrastructure.

Soldiers, families and civilians

In March, Lt. Gen. Michael Ferriter, commander, Installation Management Command, reviewed USAG-HI’s training areas, installation services and levels of support. Before departing Hawaii, he talked candidly with Soldiers and employees about IMCOM’s personnel reductions.

The Garrison held four Facebook town halls to address community concerns. The online forum has proven especially popular with 25- to 34-year-old Soldiers and family members. Subject matter experts personally responded to more than 6,460 comments and questions posted during the town halls.

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Dan Foreman, natural resource management specialist with the Oahu Army Natural Resources Program, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, monitors the health of an endangered akoko plant, in a remote native forest of the Waianae Mountains. OANRP regularly measures plant growth, health and reproductive status to gauge the success of plants reintroduced in the wild. (Courtesy U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii)

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Dan Foreman, natural resource management specialist with the Oahu Army Natural Resources Program, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, monitors the health of an endangered akoko plant, in a remote native forest of the Waianae Mountains. OANRP regularly measures plant growth, health and reproductive status to gauge the success of plants reintroduced in the wild. (Courtesy U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii)

2012 was a boom for new construction: A new barracks complex for more than 200 25th Infantry Division Soldiers opened in January; groundbreakings were held for new barracks for the Warriors in Transition Battalion, also at Schofield, in April, and for the 516th Signal Brigade at Helemano Military Reservation, in June. Total occupancy will be approximately 600 for all three barracks.

“These highly energy-efficient barracks provide Soldiers with modern accommodations, while also helping to reduce the post’s energy consumption and costs,” said former garrison commander Col. Douglas Mulbury, now chief of staff for 25th ID.

The installation recorded three changes of command: Lt. Col. Eric Shwedo at USAG-Pohakuloa, July 10; Col. Daniel Whitney at USAG-HI, July 17; and Capt. Parris Watson at Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Aug. 16. Also, Command Sgt. Maj. Philip Brunwald took responsibility as garrison’s senior enlisted leader, July 17.

Soon after taking command, Whitney told his directors and chiefs to shape conditions to benefit Soldiers and their families. During an off-site in October, senior leadership realigned the installation’s mission — “supporting each warrior, family and community with sustainable services, ensuring power projection readiness from Hawaii” – to its strategic plan.

Initiatives, sustainability and honors

As March closed, the 25th ID, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, and USAG-HI partnered in a “Hometown Pride” campaign, designed to embrace “ahahui,” Hawaiian for “bringing a group of people together.” The campaign aims to deter speeding and promote safe, well-groomed communities.

In late April-early May, the Garrison’s sustainability efforts benefited from collaboration with the University of Hawaii Community College System, as USAG-HI transferred 32 trailers, totaling 24,000 square feet of space, to UH for use as classrooms and faculty offices.

Lt. Col. Eric Shwedo, incoming commander, U.S. Army Garrison-Pohakuloa, addresses the garrison during the change of command ceremony, July 10. (Bob McElroy | USAG-Pohakuloa )

Lt. Col. Eric Shwedo, incoming commander, U.S. Army Garrison-Pohakuloa, addresses the garrison during the change of command ceremony, July 10. (Bob McElroy | USAG-Pohakuloa )

“We leveraged resources, got to a common sense solution that saved dollars, and will support the community well into the future,” said Col. Jay Hammer, former executive officer, USAG-HI. Whitney, along with commanders of the other Oahu military installations, pledged closer partnership with the City and County of Honolulu on sustainability and solid waste management issues, signing a memorandum of understanding with former Mayor Peter Carlisle, Nov. 15.

Among honors, USAG-HI received two prestigious awards in 2012. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Environment, Safety and Occupational Health presented the Natural Resources Conservation Team Award for 2011 to the Oahu Army Natural Resources Program, May 5. The Hawaii Historic Foundation presented the 2012 Preservation Award — Hawaii’s highest recognition for projects supporting the state’s architectural, archaeological and cultural heritage — to Fort Shafter’s Aloha Center, Building 330, May 11.

On a regular basis, garrison supports more than 94,500 Soldiers, families, civilians and retirees across 22 military installations and training areas; and through numerous deployments.

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Category: Army Community Covenant, News

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