Warriors train for decisive action

| January 25, 2013 | 0 Comments
Gen. Raymond  Odierno (center), U.S. Army Chief of Staff, tours the Mission Command Exercise, Jan. 9, with (from left) Col. Thomas Mackey, commander, 2nd SBCT, 25th ID; Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Crosby, senior enlisted leader, 2nd SBCT; and Maj. Gen. Kurt Fuller, commander, 25th ID. The MCX is designed to prepare leaders and staff for future contingency missions using the Military Decision Making Process for planning and executing operations.

Gen. Raymond Odierno (center), U.S. Army Chief of Staff, tours the Mission Command Exercise, Jan. 9, with (from left) Col. Thomas Mackey, commander, 2nd SBCT, 25th ID; Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Crosby, senior enlisted leader, 2nd SBCT; and Maj. Gen. Kurt Fuller, commander, 25th ID. The MCX is designed to prepare leaders and staff for future contingency missions using the Military Decision Making Process for planning and executing operations.

Story and photo by
Sgt. Daniel Johnson
2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs
25th Infantry Division

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Leaders of the 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, and subordinate units, gathered for a Mission Command Exercise at the Mission Training Complex, here, with an emphasis on the Military Decision Making Process (MDMP), Jan. 7.

Retired Brig. Gen. Randy Anderson, senior mentor for the Mission Command Training Program (MCTP) at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., served as an advisor to the Warrior commander, Col. Thomas Mackey.

“MCTP works with commanders and their staffs in both the art and science of mission command,” said Anderson. “It is primarily two parts: what does the commander need to know, the art, and how does the staff support him, the science.”

“This mission command exercise is to train and prepare the brigade staff for its upcoming rotation to the National Training Center and future deployments in support of Operation Enduring Freedom,” said Lt. Col. Timothy Mungie, executive officer, 2nd SBCT.

Military and civilian members of the MCTP accompanied Anderson to help facilitate the training.

Soldiers and civilians based at Fort Leavenworth work in parallel to their respective staff elements as observer, coach and trainer, said Anderson. Essentially, they train the staff in a way to accomplish something, coach them in the process and observe the implementation of the training.

“Not only did the team from Leavenworth provide outstanding oversight and input to this training exercise, but the staff came into the training with a decent foundation, and we’ve been able to begin building from there,” said Mungie.

This training is fundamental to teach concepts that can be adapted and used in a variety of situations and not for a single specific mission.

“This training event is not specifically to train them for their next mission, but is to prepare them and give them training in the staff process,” Anderson said. “This is not a mission readiness exercise. This is to give the staff exposure and training in how to plan, and the commander in how to give guidance and drive that process.”

This type of training is invaluable for commanders and their staff as managing a battlefield and generating orders based on the commander’s vision is no simple task.

“The biggest training objective was the MDMP,” said Anderson, “the planning and the value of learning how to plan that a staff has to do to support the brigade’s mission.”

“Essentially you are given a large complicated or complex problem, and the MDMP helps you to break that problem down into pieces that you can then work toward a solution,” said Mungie. “The MDMP provides steps that take you from simply data and knowledge of a problem set to understanding and being able to tackle and solve the problem.”

“What we generally see is that it’s not a light bulb moment; it’s a turning up of the rheostat on the light bulb, getting brighter and brighter as the staff understands, acknowledges and sees themselves and how they should have done something differently,” said Anderson.

The staff is the planning and synchronization element for the commanding officer, said Mungie, so that the commander can concentrate on the current fight.

This exercise has helped to expand the knowledge base of the leaders in the brigade and prepare them for future contingency missions in the Pacific and abroad.

“This has served as a building block for our next event when we continue to train our companies,” said Mungie. “We’ll take those companies through their situational training exercises and live-fire exercises in addition to another Military Decision Making Exercise like we’ve done here.”

 

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Category: News, Training

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