Handheld scanners use technology to detect hidden threats, save lives

| February 1, 2013 | 0 Comments
Sgt. Jeffrey Ligohr (right), Co. B, 1st Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, and Spc. Travis Duckworth (left), Btry. B, 2nd Bn., 11th FA Regt., 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, train with handheld counter IED equipment as part of Enabler Training during a two-day operators course, held recently. Enabler Training is happening across the brigade in preparation for the upcoming Warrior Spear brigade field exercise and rotation at the National Training Center.

Sgt. Jeffrey Ligohr (right), Co. B, 1st Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, and Spc. Travis Duckworth (left), Btry. B, 2nd Bn., 11th FA Regt., 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, train with handheld counter IED equipment as part of Enabler Training during a two-day operators course, held recently. Enabler Training is happening across the brigade in preparation for the upcoming Warrior Spear brigade field exercise and rotation at the National Training Center.

Story and photo by
Staff Sgt. Sean Everette
2nd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs
25th Infantry Division

Trainers from the Asia-Pacific Counter Improvised Explosive Device Fusion Cell spent the past two weeks teaching 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Soldiers how to detect IEDs using handheld devices.

The first week was a five-day train-the-trainer course, so Soldiers could go back to their units and train others; the second week was a pair of two-day operator courses, designed to familiarize Soldiers with equipment.

“They can open the equipment up, put it in operation and work it,” said Terry Perez, lead trainer for the cell.

Instructors in the class taught several different detection devices, including the “Gizmo” and the “Minehound.”

“The way it works is, the metal detector sends electrical currents through the ground,” said Perez. “The metal sends off an electromagnetic field. The Minehound picks the field up and sends off a signature. The ground-penetrating radar sends off radio frequencies, much like sonar. It sends it down, picks it up, then returns and gives a signal.”

Ultimately, this training and equipment should equate to fewer IED casualties by detecting explosives before they can cause any damage.

“The bottom line is saving people’s lives,” said Staff Sgt. Jeremy Newman, 66th Engineer Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 2nd SBCT, one of the Soldiers who took the train-the-trainer course. “Instead of stepping on the IEDs or stepping on the pressure plates, you can find them a lot better and quicker, a lot easier.”

After taking the class, Newman believes more Soldiers should also go through the training.

“Send as many people to the class as possible,” he said. “It’s essential.”

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Category: News, Training

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