1-21air assaults MOUT site for Warrior Spear

| February 15, 2013 | 0 Comments
A CH-47 Chinook takes off from Schofield Barracks with a load of Soldiers from 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Inf. Division, to air assault into a Situational Training Exercise, here, recently. This STX is just one of three lanes that make up the brigade exercise Warrior Spear. (Photo by 1st Lt. Dan North, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division)

A CH-47 Chinook takes off from Schofield Barracks with a load of Soldiers from 1st Bn., 21st Inf. Regt., 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, to air assault into a situational training exercise. This STX is just one of three lanes that make up the brigade exercise Warrior Spear. (Photo by 1st Lt. Dan North, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division)

Story and photos by Sgt. Daniel Johnson
2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs,
25th Infantry Division

Soldiers of 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Inf. Division air assaulted into the Kahuku Military Training Area for a tactical assault during a military operations on urban terrain training mission, Feb. 1.

The training is part of Warrior Spear, a larger brigade-wide exercise conducted by the 2nd SBCT to prepare Soldiers for an upcoming deployment to the National Training Center in California.

Warriors pour out of a  CH-47 Chinook after a brief flight from Schofield Baracks.

Warriors pour out of a CH-47 Chinook after a brief flight from Schofield Baracks.

The mission began with an air assault from Schofield Barracks to the landing zone, where Soldiers dismounted a CH-47 Chinook and began a two-hour foot march to the MOUT site.

“The key thing for us was getting these Soldiers used to using the enablers, such as female engagement teams and the tactical explosive detection teams,” said Sgt. Maj. Eric Alfieri, operations senior enlisted leader, 1st Bn., 21st Inf. Regt., 2nd SBCT. “It prepares them for the National Training Center and future operations in Afghanistan,” Alfieri added.

During the foot march and throughout the assault, Soldiers used improvised explosive detection equipment to ensure unit safety against improvised explosive devices.

After a two hour road march, Soldiers move throughout the MOUT site.

After a two hour road march, Soldiers move into the MOUT site.

“The number one killer and wounder in Afghanistan is IEDs,” said Greg Baker, a counter-IED tactical adviser with the Joint IED Defeat Organization. “Anything we can do to help prepare them to mitigate the IED threat is going to increase survivability.”

Baker was on hand to help ensure the scenario was able to accurately reflect the current IED situation in Afghanistan.

“I helped make a few adjustments to the scenarios to make them as realistic in their depiction of enemy tactics, techniques and procedures as possible,” said Baker. “I also observed to see how they are tackling those problem sets.”

Warrior Spear participants secure the MOUT site, making the most of enablers like female engagement and tactical explosive detection teams.

Warrior Spear participants secure the MOUT site, making the most of enablers like female engagement and tactical explosive detection teams.

The Soldiers on the ground were not the only ones receiving training during the mission; every part of the battalion participated.

“As these companies have engagements, our tactical operations center is receiving and processing the reports,” said Alfieri. “Everyone in the battalion is getting good training here.”

This training will ensure Soldiers of the 2nd SBCT are prepared for NTC and future operations in Afghanistan.

“Our battalion has been very successful, and all of the training out here has been great,” said Alfieri. “Not just for our line companies, but for all of our operations.”

 

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