Strykers partner with Special Forces for ANET

| March 14, 2013 | 0 Comments
Spc. Brandon Railey (left), an infantryman with 1st Battalion, 27th Inf. Regiment, 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, receives individual instruction from retired SF Master Sgt. Russell Turner, from Soldier, Sensors and Lasers, as part of ANET training, March 6.

Spc. Brandon Railey (left), an infantryman with 1st Battalion, 27th Inf. Regiment, 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, receives individual instruction from retired SF Master Sgt. Russell Turner, from Soldier, Sensors and Lasers, as part of ANET training, March 6.

Story and photos by
Sgt. Daniel Johnson
2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers of 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, have been training with retired Special Forces Soldiers as part of an Advanced New Equipment Training (ANET) program, here, since March 5.

The training focuses on fundamental combat marksmanship training while introducing new advanced optics systems and engagement techniques.

Soldiers of 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, train with retired SF Soldiers from Soldier, Sensors and Lasers as part of an ANET exercise, March 6. The program ensures Soldiers are properly trained on techniques and equipment.

Soldiers of 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, train with retired SF Soldiers from Soldier, Sensors and Lasers as part of an ANET exercise, March 6. The program ensures Soldiers are properly trained on techniques and equipment.

The training is conducted by retired SF Soldiers working for Soldiers, Sensors and Lasers.

“The training begins on the first day in the classroom,” said retired Master Sgt. Victor Combes, lead trainer for the ANET program. “We make sure they have a full understanding of Close Combat Optics, thermal imaging systems and night vision systems that will be used during the course.

“The second day is grouping and zeroing of the weapon systems before an initial evaluation,” Combes added.

Once the initial evaluation was completed, the Soldiers moved on to stationary combat marksmanship training to reinforce fundamentals.

“We’re fundamental heavy. We want to ensure they understand the eight fundamentals of combat marksmanship,” Combes said.

“There is a large focus on fundamentals, making sure we are combat marksmanship proficient before incorporating the advanced optics,” said Spc. Brandon Railey, an infantryman with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Inf. Regiment, 2nd SBCT.

Spc. Brandon Railey, an infantryman with 1st Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, fires live rounds down range using a thermal sight as part of ANET.

Spc. Brandon Railey, an infantryman with 1st Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, fires live rounds down range using a thermal sight as part of ANET.

Day three is when the training became more advanced, with Soldiers incorporating advancement movement and engagement techniques.

Next, Soldiers advanced into multi-target engagements, followed by the culmination exercise, which consisted of an urban assault course and woodland assault course using thermal targets.

“This training is making all of us more lethal fighters,” said Railey. “It has only been a couple days, and we are all much more proficient. Being able to use these new systems gives us more capabilities, especially the thermal systems.”

“No one hides from thermal,” added Combes. “The better understanding they have of the system, the better survivability they will have.”

Knowing their equipment and how to properly utilize it can be the difference between life and death for individual Soldiers and their buddy next to them.

“This is a train-the-trainer type program,” said Combes. “We want this group to go back to their unit and conduct similar training for their Soldiers.”

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Category: News, Training

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