Strykers prepare for the IED threat

| March 29, 2013 | 0 Comments
Sgt. 1st Class Robert Madison, a senior instructor with the U.S. Army Pacific Command Counter-IED Fusion Center, uses a military metal detector to search for possible IED threats during dismounted counter-IED training, March 20.

Sgt. 1st Class Robert Madison, a senior instructor with the U.S. Army Pacific Command Counter-IED Fusion Center, uses a military metal detector to search for possible IED threats during dismounted counter-IED training, March 20.

Story and photos by
Sgt. Daniel Johnson
2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers of the 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, partnered with Counter-IED Fusion Cell Soldiers and instructors, here, March 20, to train on the latest in counter-improvised explosive device techniques, tactics and procedures (TTPs).

“The training we’re doing today is counter-IED TTPs,” said Staff Sgt. Isaac Strother, battalion master gunner, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Inf. Regiment, 2nd SBCT. “There are mock IEDs placed on the lane, and we’re responsible for finding and neutralizing the threat they present.”

IEDs are the No. 1 killer of Soldiers around the world. Ensuring our Soldiers are prepared to mitigate that threat is essential in ensuring the continued safety of our troops.

Soldiers with 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, plan the route they will clear using counter-IED techniques as part of their dismounted counter-IED training.

Soldiers with 2nd SBCT, 25th ID, plan the route they will clear using counter-IED techniques as part of their dismounted counter-IED training.

“This training deals with the mitigation of the IED threat,” said Sgt. 1st Class Robert Madison, a senior instructor with the U.S. Army Pacific Command Counter-IED Fusion Center. “The goal is to better prepare Soldiers to identify the threat prior to reaching the danger.”

According to Madison, the program is designed to change the way Soldiers approach IED threats.

“As combat arms, we’re primarily trained in react-to-combat and force-on-force situations. This training helps to shift that mindset to a more preventative posture,” Madison explained.

One way Soldiers make that shift is to use various TTPs and devices to aid them in defeating the IED threat.

“We are pulling information from various sources, such as enemy techniques that have been observed in theatre,” said Madison. “We then incorporate that information into the training.”

Most of the equipment is designed to detect a threat without directly interacting with it.

Soldiers and Counter IED Fusion Center members patrol the area for IED threats using advanced detection equipment and K-9 units.

Soldiers and Counter IED Fusion Center members patrol the area for IED threats using advanced detection equipment and K-9 units.

Once the possibility of a threat is identified, Soldiers employ multiple devices to counter them, said Madison.

“We are training the Soldiers to think like the enemy, so they are better equipped to identify vulnerable areas as they come to them,” Madison said. “The whole premise behind this class is to look at the ground signs and be more situationally aware to find the threat and not just rely on the technology we have available.”

As with most Army training programs, this course is train-the-trainer. Soldiers who complete the course are expected to return to their units and implement similar training for the rest of their unit.

“IEDs are the biggest killers in theatre,” said Strother. “The more people who are trained in dealing with this threat, the more lives we’re going to save. It’s pretty important.”

“When these Soldiers are done with this training, they are assigned to their units as the counter-IED specialists,” Madison added. “They will then set up training for the rest of their unit to ensure everyone is more capable of defeating this type of threat.”

“Being a dismounted counter-IED trainer isn’t very helpful if you aren’t training anyone,” Strother said. “So, the more Soldiers you set up lanes for and train on the TTPs, the more lives it will save in the long run.”

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Category: News, Training

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *