New Weapons for cancer war at TAMC

| June 21, 2013 | 0 Comments
Mark Ahsing (standing, right), therapy technician, and Kyle Nishimura, therapy technician, both with Radiation Oncology, TAMC, demonstrate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT), in which they stablize the patient in order to precisely target a tumor with minimal radiation expore to the surrounding tissue. (Photo by Sgt. Margaret Jordan, Tripler Army Medical Center Public Affairs)

Mark Ahsing (standing, right), therapy technician, and Kyle Nishimura, therapy technician, both with Radiation Oncology, TAMC, demonstrate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT), in which they stablize the patient in order to precisely target a tumor with minimal radiation expore to the surrounding tissue. (Photo by Sgt. Margaret Jordan, Tripler Army Medical Center Public Affairs)

Maj. Timothy Wagner
Radiation Oncology Service
Tripler Army Medical Center

HONOLULU — The Tripler Army Medical Center Radiation Oncology Service is excited to announce the arrival of two new technologies that are helping to revolutionize cancer treatment.

The first treatment advance is Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT).

SBRT is a state-of-the-art treatment technique that uses precisely targeted external beam radiation to maximize radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing radiation exposure to the surrounding normal tissues.

In diseases such as early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer, treatment with SBRT has been shown to be a highly effective and safe alternative to surgery for patients who cannot safely undergo a major operation because of other medical conditions.

SBRT has been used to successfully treat several patients with a variety of cancers with excellent results.

The TAMC Radiation Oncology Service also recently launched its high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy program.

HDR is another highly effective way to maximize radiation dose to the cancer, while minimizing radiation exposure to the surrounding healthy tissue. HDR brachytherapy allows for very precise radiation treatment for cancer and is usually completed within minutes.

HDR has shown promise in a variety of cancers, including many gynecologic malignancies, sarcomas and skin cancer.

 

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Category: Community, Health

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