2-27th Infantry Regiment has ‘no fear’ at KTA

| September 11, 2013 | 0 Comments
Soldiers from Co. B, 2nd Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., begin a patrol to search for opposing forces. The opposition was free to use its own tactics, making the training more challenging.

Soldiers from Co. B, 2nd Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., begin a patrol to search for opposing forces. The opposition was free to use its own tactics, making the training more challenging.

Exercise is a ‘gut check’

Story and photos by Sgt. Brian Erickson
3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division

KAHUKU TRAINING AREA — Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, conducted company level training operations during their “No Fear War” at Kahuku Military Training Area, Aug. 25-28.

The training scenarios were designed to refresh basics like creating fighting positions, sending out small patrols and conducting search and attack operations.

“This training is meant be a gut check for these commanders and their Soldiers,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Tony Tuck, senior enlisted leader, 2-27th Inf. Regt.

KAHUKU TRAINING AREA — Pvt. Matthew Badgley, Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, refills water canteens during a tactical re-supply of water in the midst of Operation "No Fear War," here, Aug. 28. (Photo by Sgt. Brian Erickson, 3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

KAHUKU TRAINING AREA — Pvt. Matthew Badgley, Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, refills water canteens during a tactical re-supply of water in the midst of Operation “No Fear War,” here, Aug. 28. (Photo by Sgt. Brian Erickson, 3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

The journey began for each company when the unit was airlifted into KTA during the dark of night. Once on the ground, Soldiers began a foot movement across the rigid terrain to a designated location.

“The goal for these guys is to have their area of operation set up before the sun comes up,” said Tuck. “In the old days, this type of movement was known as the movement to light.”

As soon as the Soldiers were set up, commanders sent out patrols to find a known enemy in the area that was attacking their supply sources.

“The training is what we call ‘free play’ method. Each commander is given a mission, and it is up to them how they complete their tasks,” said Capt. Zack Long, tactical operations center (TOC) battle captain, 2-27th Inf. Regt.

Each company had roughly 72 hours to find and destroy the enemy. In order to accomplish that, it used its choice of multiple enablers. Companies could request Explosive Ordnance Disposal in the event they found an improvised explosive device, or IED, during the scenario. Units could call in helicopters to fly overhead and relay back enemy positions. They also had to coordinate with their TOCs to schedule tactical resupply missions to make ensure the Soldiers had enough water and ammunition in order to keep up the fight.

The opposing forces also acted on their own accord. Unlike most training where leaders know when attacks will happen, no one knew exactly when they’d face enemy engagements.

After the missions were complete and all enemy targets eliminated, company commanders got the call to move their Soldiers to the extraction point and return home.

KAHUKU TRAINING AREA — Spc. Edrick Hid, Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, scans over his sector of fire from his look-out position during Operation "No Fear War" training exercise, here, Aug. 28. (Photo by Sgt. Brian Erickson, 3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

KAHUKU TRAINING AREA — Spc. Edrick Hid, Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, scans over his sector of fire from his look-out position during Operation “No Fear War” training exercise, here, Aug. 28. (Photo by Sgt. Brian Erickson, 3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

According to Tuck, the training is just a precursor to what the Soldiers will face when they travel to the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC), next year.

“This training will give each company a good look at what they need to fix before they head off to JRTC next year,” said Tuck.

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Category: Exercises, News, Training

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