Courtesy patrols to enforce Army regulations, standards

| October 4, 2013 | 6 Comments
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Senior leaders and officers from 8th Theater Sustainment Command and the 25th Infantry Division's 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 3rd BCT and 25th Combat Aviation Bde. will provide presence and help enforce good order and discipline to strengthen communities, here and on Wheeler Army Airfield, as part of the 25th ID's new Lightning Strong initiative. (Photo by Sgt. Matthew Ryan, 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Senior leaders and officers from 8th Theater Sustainment Command and the 25th Infantry Division’s 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 3rd BCT and 25th Combat Aviation Bde. will provide presence and help enforce good order and discipline to strengthen communities, here and on Wheeler Army Airfield, as part of the 25th ID’s new Lightning Strong initiative. (Photo by Sgt. Matthew Ryan, 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

25th Infantry Division Public Affairs, News Release

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The 25th Infantry Division is scheduled to begin courtesy patrols, here, and on Wheeler Army Airfield, Monday, to increase safety awareness and enforce Army regulations, policies and standards.

The courtesy patrol is an extension of Maj. Gen. Kurt Fuller, senior commander, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii, and commander, 25th ID, and Command Sgt. Maj. Benjamin Jones, senior enlisted adviser, 25th ID, to straightforwardly enforce regulations and policies outlined in the Army Regulations, the Commanding General’s Standards of Conduct Memorandum and the 25th ID Blue Book.

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS -- A Courtesy Patrol stands ready. (Photo by Sgt. Matthew Ryan, 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — A Courtesy Patrol stands ready. (Photo by Sgt. Matthew Ryan, 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

The courtesy patrol will inform and educate leaders, Soldiers and their families to the policies provided in these publications, and establish a safe environment conducive to good order and discipline.

“The courtesy patrol will help build the resiliency by showing what right looks like and providing a greater presence, making our military community stronger,” said Sgt. Maj. Robert Parker, provost sergeant major, 25th ID.

“Soldiers need the right example to become better leaders, and this will spread to within their ranks, units and, ultimately, to the community,” Parker added.

Courtesy patrol teams will consist of senior leaders and officers from the 25th ID’s 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 3rd BCT, 25th Combat Aviation Bde. and the 8th Theater Sustainment Command, who will patrol high-traffic areas. These areas will include facilities, family housing areas and common areas, such as the commissary and Army Exchange stores, here, and on WAAF.

“The presence of a patrol in military housing will definitely deter anyone from trying to commit a crime, and that makes me feel safer, especially when my husband is out working,” said Tiffany Andrews, wife of Spc. Ratiguel Andrews, Military Police, 2nd Battalion, 11th Field Artillery, 2nd SBCT.

Andrews is looking forward to seeing the patrols start, here, and the effects it will have on the community.

While on patrol, the teams will look for discrepancies in uniforms and civilian dress codes, Soldiers not in compliance with haircut regulations, loud music being played and use of profanity in family and common areas, all in accordance with garrison policies and the 25th ID Blue Book.

Courtesy patrollers will stop the offending party and make on-the-spot corrections and explain the discrepancy.

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The Courtesy Patrol insignia is displayed. (Photo by Sgt. Matthew Ryan, 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The Courtesy Patrol insignia is displayed. (Photo by Sgt. Matthew Ryan, 25th Infantry Division Public Affairs)

“It will be good to see Soldiers, families and civilians adhering to the polices and standards concerning the dress codes within the commissary,” said Sgt. 1st Class Kendrick Bryant, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd BCT. “It will be good to see Soldiers helping Soldiers building a stronger community for our families.”

“I have been to other installations that have a courtesy patrol and seen the success,” Parker added. “You could see a positive effect within the communities.”

Parker also noted he has had civilians on previous posts say that Soldiers are staying out of trouble and following the standards.

“It will have a positive effect that you will be able to start to see within the first 30 days of being activated,” Parker said.

Courtesy patrol teams work in conjunction with the MPs, the Provost Marshal Office, the Directorate of Emergency Services and USAG-HI.

The patrol also plans to work with community neighborhood watch programs for a greater effect on the community.

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Comments (6)

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  1. Michael Grein says:

    Let’s first start off by putting a picture with the article where the Soldiers are within AR 670-1. The two middle Soldiers have ink pens/pencils showing in uniform – not IAW with AR 670-1, 1-14.2

    • Jonathan Nguyen says:

      They are within the current regulations. AR 670-1 is so far out of date, I can’t even keep track of how many ALARACT messages are in place to update it. ALARACT 140/2007 para 4 states “PENS/PENCILS WORN
      IN THE PEN/PENCIL SLOTS ON THE ACU COAT CAN BE EXPOSED. NOTE: THERE ARE
      NO STIPULATIONS ON THE COLORS OF PENS/PENCILS WORN IN THE SLOTS ON THE
      ACU COAT.”

    • Robert McGiven says:

      Let’s first start off by mentioning that AR 670-1 does not even cover ACU’s.

  2. Mina says:

    I am a civilian who shops at this location a lot with my father who is retired Air Force. I walked in to the commissary and was stopped by an African American soldier in uniform. I did not get her name. Apparently, she was calling for me to stop a couple times, but I didn’t hear her. She made a comment to my father, in a very rude tone and attitude stating, “I know she heard me.” I didn’t, because I would have stopped. I walked back out of the commissary and she told me my shorts are not authorized. I thought she was joking and me and my father laughed and asked her if she was serious. I have lived in Hawaii for over 20 years and never been stopped on base for my dress code. I always wear short shorts and never been stopped before entering a facility. I said ok, and sat outside with her and her co-worker to wait until my father was done shopping. I asked her about the dress code because I was so confused and never heard about it before. She told me my shorts are not authorized and pants with holes in them are not authorized.
    I sat there for about 30 minutes and watched every customer walk inside the store. There were two soldiers on duty, one female and one male. The male soldier was a short “local” Asian looking man. I did not get his name. He was standing up the entire time and was very aware and tentative of his surroundings and watched everyone who was entering and exiting. The female soldier on the other hand was sitting and had her hand under her chin the entire time. She looked very upset and miserable. The male soldier stopped a couple where the young man was wearing a tank top. The soldier told this man, “Your shirt is not authorized”. The man stated, “It’s not a “wife-beater”, it’s a tank top”. The soldier stated again that his shirt is not authorized, so the couple left. I am assuming that “wife-beaters” are considered not appropriate attire.
    A soldier was walking across the parking lot and street while texting on his phone. The female soldier stated, “Is he serious right now?”, and pointed at this soldier. The male soldier walked very quickly and approached this soldier and the soldier smiled and put his phone in this pocket and said hi. The male soldier then saluted this soldier, and the officer saluted back at him. The officer grabbed a cart and entered the commissary. I stated, “You can’t say anything to him because he’s our boss?” I did not get a reply from either of them, all I heard was crickets. This made me upset.
    Two girls walked in with short shorts. One girl was wearing short cut-off shorts, similar to the style of shorts that I was wearing. The other girl was wearing really short black shorts and her butt was hanging out and her thighs were suffocating. The female soldier did not say one word to them. I asked her why her shorts are authorized and told her that her butt was hanging out. The female soldier told me that my shorts are cut at a V, and not straight across. This does not make sense to me.

    I have yet to receive a phone call from Sergeant Major Robert Parks.

    • haw says:

      Hello!
      Since the 25th ID fielded the Courtesy Patrol on Oct. 7, 2013, overall feedback from the community has been positive. Each day, leaders are briefed on both regulations and local policies prior to assuming duty as the 25th ID Courtesy Patrol.
      Further, our leaders are provided with examples of what civilian attire is not acceptable in our facilities, in accordance with the Garrison Commander’s Policy on civilian attire. Evaluations made by our leaders may vary slightly from leader to leader; however, we believe that we are enforcing standards as consistently as possible.
      We appreciate this feedback and will use this comment constructively by incorporating it into our daily briefings.

      Thank you very much,

      v/r
      SGM Parker

      SGM ROBERT L. PARKER II
      “Tropic Lightning!”
      25th Infantry Division Provost Marshal Office
      Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

  3. Aaron Frost says:

    With all due respect, if you can’t abide to the Army regulations and policies in place. I recommend shopping elsewhere. Just because no one has corrected you before, does not make your clothing appropriate to Army standards.

    Mahalo!!

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