Warriors train Malaysian medics in latest procedures

| October 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
MAF soldiers carry a patient by litter after a simulated attack during the MFR course. (Photos by Staff Sgt. Sean Everette, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

MAF soldiers carry a patient by litter after a simulated attack during the MFR course. (Photos by Staff Sgt. Sean Everette, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

Staff Sgt. William Sallette
U.S. Army-Pacific Public Affairs

LAPANGAN TERBAND CAMP, Malaysia — Trainers from the U.S. Army certified 37 medical personnel from the Malaysian Armed Forces (MAF) in the Medical First Responders (MFR) course during the Keris Strike 13 exercise, here, Sept. 23.

A MAF soldier applies a chest seal to an open chest wound on a patient after a simulated attack during the MFR course.

A MAF soldier applies a chest seal to an open chest wound on a patient after a simulated attack during the MFR course.

The MFR course is modeled after the Army’s Combat Life Saver course and is a major part of the MAF training program during Keris Strike, a U.S. Army-Pacific and MAF bilateral Theater Security Cooperation Program event that strengthens the two countries’ capabilities in military-to-military cooperation while focusing on international peace support operations.

Each year, the MAF selects a different unit and sends the best medical personnel from that unit to attend the course.

The course is similar each year, but with changes in technology and practices, the training allows new students the opportunity to gain the most current knowledge and then transfer that information to the soldiers in their units.

“Combat medicine is ever-changing,” said Capt. Yolanda Benson, commander, Company C, 225th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Stryker Bde. Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division. “We adapt procedures all the time to ensure that we are providing the best care possible, and that is what we want to provide the MAF soldiers with each year.”

MAF soldiers deploy on multiple peacekeeping missions every year, and because of their position in the Pacific, they must always be ready to provide disaster relief and humanitarian assistance.

In MFR training, MAF soldiers learn how to control bleeding, open and manage a casualty’s airway, and other tactical casualty combat care.

The consolidated, 40-hour course culminated with the soldiers conducting testing lanes, where they would have to react to a number of situations and use what they had been taught to assist the casualties before them.

MAF soldiers treat a patient after a simulated attack during the MFR course.

MAF soldiers treat a patient after a simulated attack during the MFR course.

“Even from the first day of instruction, we quickly realized that there wouldn’t be any barriers to overcome,” said Benson.

“The students immediately picked up on the course material, and all had a good time during the course,” Benson added.

Following certification, Army Soldiers conducted additional training on burns, hot- and cold-weather injuries, snake and insect bites, and then discussed case studies from Iraq and Afghanistan.

“Many of our deployments are under the United Nations, and they require us to partner with many nations, including the U.S.,” said Capt. Nor Hidayah, with the MAF Sick Center.

“This training will better prepare us for those missions, because we now have the knowledge and techniques that are used to better manage the patient care,” Hidayah concluded.

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Category: Exercises, News, Training

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