MFT prevents injuries, enables warfigher readiness

| March 14, 2014 | 0 Comments
 Sgt. Jesse Untalan, 8th Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs  8th TSC warriors and Soldiers from other USARPAC commands (plus one civilian) practice to become master fitness trainer qualified. Training that began Feb. 10 ended Friday.

Photos by Sgt. Jesse Untalan, 8th Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs
8th TSC warriors and Soldiers from other USARPAC commands (plus one civilian) practice to become master fitness trainer qualified. Training that began Feb. 10 ended Friday.

Staff Sgt. Gaelen Lowers
8th Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs

WHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD — Preventing injuries is the idea behind the master fitness trainer (MFT) program, which is why 49 Soldiers and one civilian with the 8th Theater Sustainment Command (and across the island of Oahu) dedicated four weeks (Feb. 10-March 7) to train and become MFT qualified.

The program is designed to lead units’ Soldiers in their daily physical readiness training (PRT) and prepare them for the rigors of war.

“It’s really fun to see the non-PRT believers fully embrace the program,” said Devan Icsman-Wethington, personal trainer and MFT instructor. “They typically become the program’s biggest supporters and implementers.”

The first two weeks are mostly in the classroom, where students learn about exercise and muscle physiology, said Icsman-Wethington, but in weeks three and four, students apply what they’ve learned and pump up the workouts.

What would any Army training be without miles of running?

What would any Army training be without miles of running?

In the fall of 2012, Army Field Manual “Physical Readiness Training” became doctrine. The following year, mobile training teams began traveling to Army installations across the globe.

“Depending on the number of cadre needing training, that will determine the number of monthlong classes the teams will hold,” Icsman-Wethington said.

Warriors who graduated the training agreed with the program’s training and philosophy.

“We want to train like we fight,” said Sgt. Tarisha Sanders, plans noncommissioned officer, 8th Special Troops Battalion, 8th TSC. “We need to be ready and effective, and injuries will prevent us from being combat ready. We learned the fundamentals of PRT and how to execute the program properly by using precision, progression and integration. The precision aspect of the training really cuts down on injury.”

After graduating, Soldiers return to their units with the title of MFT, and with that title come obligations, said Icsman-Wethington.

“We hope that every person we graduate will go forward with the principles they learned over the past month and apply them to their lives and, of course, with their Soldiers,” she concluded.

A master fitness trainer coaches a Soldier in the familiar front-leaning rest position.

A master fitness trainer coaches a Soldier in the familiar front-leaning rest position.

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Category: News, Training

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