Army prioritizes child abuse prevention initiative

| April 12, 2014 | 0 Comments
Photo courtesy Army Community Service; Directorate of Family and Morale; Welfare and Recreation; U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii HONOLULU — Royal-blue pinwheels dot the lawn of the Hawaii Capitol, here, in recognition that April is Child Abuse Prevention Month.

Photo courtesy Army Community Service; Directorate of Family and Morale; Welfare and Recreation; U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii
HONOLULU — Royal-blue pinwheels dot the lawn of the Hawaii Capitol, here, in recognition that April is Child Abuse Prevention Month.

 

Robert Dozier
Army News Service

SAN ANTONIO — The Army’s Family Advocacy Program (FAP) is making child abuse prevention the top agenda item for its service providers at garrisons and installations during the month of April.

The U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) is taking this opportunity to remind leaders, Soldiers and the Army community of the great work being done locally to preserve the health and well-being of our most valuable and vulnerable family members.

The theme of this year’s campaign is “Children’s safety comes first — be ready to end child abuse.”

IMCOM is encouraging each garrison to take the time in April to tell people about their local FAP, Army Community Service (ACS) class schedules, materials available and how to access counseling services.

“The president of the United States is calling on all of us — military and civilian, parents and non-parents — to unite in a common goal: to end the abuse of children,” said Lt. Gen. Mike Ferriter, former IMCOM commander. “I stand with the president and call upon you to make a commitment to this prevention effort in partnership with the Family Advocacy Program.”

Child abuse prevention does not work if leadership focus only occurs one month in the year. For success to be achieved, the Army must first bring awareness to everyone and then follow up with classes and counselors that deliver what it takes to succeed year-round.

“A vocal and vibrant campaign to end the abuse and maltreatment of children is still necessary in all of society,” said Novella Magwood, FAP manager. “The Army’s Family Advocacy Program focuses on the prevention effort to maximize our returns. The children deserve our best efforts.”

The FAP is congressionally mandated and intended to prevent and reduce the occurrence of family violence, while it strives to create an environment of intolerance for such behavior.

“In today’s fast-paced environment full of challenges and stresses, often it seems there is not enough time to pause long enough to reset the family,” said Col. Cox, Headquarters Department of the Army FAP manager. “Family advocacy helps to head problems off before they escalate.”

The program provides Soldiers and family members early referral and intervention services for all types of domestic violence issues. The goal is to establish sufficient safety and risk-reduction plans, such as counseling services and parenting classes, to help the Army family get the most out of its own talents and resources.

Services are available for parents of children at all ages. Participation in FAP services is stigma-free and is most effective when the family comes to the counselors early.

“Being a parent is one of the greatest experiences a young Soldier can have,” said Magwood. “Our job is to make it a little better and a little easier.”

ACS FAP
Soldiers and family members are invited to learn more about the FAP.  Go to www.himwr.com; go to “ACS” and go to “Family Life” at www.himwr.com/home-a-family-life/family-advocacy.

Month of the Military Child
The following activities are honoring military children in April.
•April 1-24. Military children can enter the worldwide “Young Lives, Big Stories” contest and have a chance to win prizes by telling their story through photos, words, drawings or videos. Open to keiki preschool through 12th. Visit himwr.com, under Month of the Military Child, for entry forms and details.
•April 1–30. Military children bowl free at Fort Shafter and Schofield Barracks. One free game for two military children ages 17 and under when one adult game is purchased. Call 438-6733 or 655-0573.
•April 14, 6 p.m. Stuffed animal sleepover at Sgt. Yano Library, Schofield Barracks, or sleepover at 6 p.m., April 15, at Fort Shafter Library. Children may drop off their furry friends for a night at the library. Call 655-8002 or 438-9521.
April 19, 8:45 a.m.-2 p.m. Fun Fest and Earth Day at Weyand Field, Schofield Barracks. Take part in a day of family activities for all ages, including a fun run, entertainment, games, rides and much more. Call 655-0111.
April 19, 2-5 p.m. Boat race and treasure dive at Richardson Pool, Schofield Barracks. Float, sink or swim with boat races, treasure dives and slingshot splash games. Call 655-0002.
April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Land of Oz        Parent-Child Ball at Nehelani, Schofield Barracks. Price is $13 for ages 3-11; $17 for ages 12 and up. Formal attire is suggested. Call 655-4466.
April 29, 6:30-7:30 a.m. PT in the Gym at Fort Shafter Physical Fitness Center. Soldiers and families can participate in a 30-minute aerobic routine followed by a continental breakfast. Call 836-1923.

 

 

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Category: Community, Health

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