Brooks talks land forces utilization at LANPAC

| April 16, 2014 | 0 Comments
U.S. Army-Pacific Commander Gen. Vincent Brooks talks to an audience about humanitarian aid and disaster relief within the Asia-Pacific region during the LANPAC Symposium April 8, 2014, in Honolulu. The LANPAC Symposium is a world-class international event highlighting the role of land forces in the Asia-Pacific theater in peace and war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

U.S. Army-Pacific Commander Gen. Vincent Brooks talks to an audience about humanitarian aid and disaster relief within the Asia-Pacific region during the LANPAC Symposium April 8, 2014, in Honolulu. The LANPAC Symposium is a world-class international event highlighting the role of land forces in the Asia-Pacific theater in peace and war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Sgt. Chris Hubenthal, Defense Media Agency

HONOLULU — General Vincent K. Brooks, commander, U.S. Army-Pacific, talked to multinational Asia-Pacific allies and partners about the utilization of land forces to maintain stability and security in the region during the second LANPAC Symposium, April 9.

Brooks delivered remarks about using service members on the ground to help nations in the region maintain stability.

“U.S. Pacific Command has been a part of a framework of underwriting security that has allowed the emergence of prosperity and changes in forms of governance for over 60 years,” Brooks said. “That is from a military capacity that’s been positioned in the region as a stabilizer, whenever possible, as a reassurance to treaty partners in the region and as a force that can respond when there is a crisis.”

U.S. Army-Pacific Deputy Commander Maj. Gen. Robert Mathews talks about the architecture of land forces in the Asia-Pacific region during the LANPAC Symposium April 8, 2014, in Honolulu. The symposium brought together government and industry representatives from allies in the Pacific theater to discuss land force utilization. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

U.S. Army-Pacific Deputy Commander Maj. Gen. Robert Mathews talks about the architecture of land forces in the Asia-Pacific region during the LANPAC Symposium April 8, 2014, in Honolulu. The symposium brought together government and industry representatives from allies in the Pacific theater to discuss land force utilization. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Brooks also addressed how important land forces are in bringing humanitarian relief to Asia-Pacific nations following a natural disaster and that cooperation between countries in the region is essential to saving lives and rebuilding.

“The work does not end with the initial response,” Brooks said. “This is once again in the land domain in a place where humans live or die that the work continues. Our efforts, though, are first intended to help a host nation deal with the consequences of not only the disaster but dealing with the consequences of the response.”

Brooks pointed to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and other countries helping the Philippines after the destruction left by Typhoon Haiyan in October 2013 as an example of multilateral cooperation between the U.S. and its allies in the Asia-Pacific.

“Multinational coordination became a very important contribution that the U.S. delegation was able to make once (the U.S. Joint Task Force was) committed there to assist the government of the Philippines in receiving countries and contributions who came with different capabilities and different resources,” Brooks explained.

General Kiyofumi Iwata, Japan Ground Self-Defense Force chief of staff, speaks to a multinational audience on Japan's objectives within the Asia-Pacific region during the LANPAC Symposium, April 8, 2014, in Honolulu. U.S. allies and partners in the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, Singapore, New Zealand and Australia, attended the symposium. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

General Kiyofumi Iwata, Japan Ground Self-Defense Force chief of staff, speaks to a multinational audience on Japan’s objectives within the Asia-Pacific region during the LANPAC Symposium, April 8, 2014, in Honolulu. U.S. allies and partners in the Asia-Pacific region, including Japan, Singapore, New Zealand and Australia, attended the symposium. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

The Asia-Pacific region contains 30 percent of the global economy and nearly half of the world’s natural disasters occur in the region, according to the United Nations Environment Programme official website.

Brooks explained how training and readiness exercises with other countries help increase preparedness when responding to these crises.

“We have a foundation of realistic scenarios in our exercises,” Brooks said. “There is a typhoon scenario for the Philippines in previous exercises in Balikatan. Humanitarian aid and disaster response, we believe, is a mechanism that can help to increase dialogue and trust so that there is not as great a potential for miscalculation.”

Relationships built between allies and partners throughout the region are key to mutual defense and form a basis for multilateral security arrangements, Brooks emphasized.

“Bilateral relationships are the cornerstones of multilateral cooperation that can become essential to success in responding to the hazards and threats of this region,” Brooks said.

Representatives from Asia-Pacific nations also discussed topics including information warfare and cyber activities, leveraging training with technology, and partnerships with nongovernmental organizations.

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Category: Community Relations, Leadership, News

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