CAB adding new capabilities to the Pacific region

| April 18, 2014 | 0 Comments
Chinook pilots from the 25th CAB conduct deck landings on one of the Navy's newest vessels, the USS Anchorage LPD-23, April 9, off Oahu. The  landings qualified the pilots and crew chiefs to land on a moving ship over open water, which has not been done by the CAB with a Chinook in more than a decade.

Chinook pilots from the 25th CAB conduct deck landings on one of the Navy’s newest vessels, the USS Anchorage LPD-23, April 9, off Oahu. The landings qualified the pilots and crew chiefs to land on a moving ship over open water, which has not been done by the CAB with a Chinook in more than a decade.

Story and photo by
Staff Sgt. Matthew G. Ryan
25th Infantry Division Public Affairs

PACIFIC OCEAN, Near Hawaii — Chinook crews from the 25th Combat Aviation Brigade partnered with the Navy to conduct deck-landing qualifications aboard the USS Anchorage (LPD-23), April 9.

Using one CH-47, nine pilots and six flight crew members from 3rd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th CAB, 25th Infantry Division, they became deck-landing qualified.

This certification allows Chinook pilots to land, stow and launch from moving Navy vessels during a wide range of operations.

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“Working with the Navy to train our pilots and crews allows us to provide more capability to the Pacific Command and the 25th ID,” said Chief Warrant Officer 5 Joseph Roland, brigade senior warrant officer. “In addition to capabilities we have built in the last year, we are adding the asset of Soldiers working off of Navy vessels, and the ability to land on ships with CH-47 Chinooks.”

From previous training, the 25th CAB has the capability to conduct deck landings with its OH-58 Kiowa Warriors and UH-60 Black Hawks. With the addition of the Chinook, the Army’s heavy-lift aircraft, the brigade has ultimate maritime flexibility.

“This kind of training allows us to provide the ability to fully support any kind of maritime mission, whether it be humanitarian assistance or disaster relief from the land or sea,” said Col. Kenneth Hawley, commander, 25th CAB.

Getting to this point required flight crews to undergo a great deal of preparation, said Roland.

Pilots have to take academic classes, perform simulated deck landings on an airfield and in a simulator, and conduct emergency breather system and underwater egress training. The training and preparation minimizes safety concerns by ensuring pilots are proficient in their skills.

“I have been flying for almost my whole career, and their approaches were right on, and landings were excellent. There were no safety issues that I saw from my Black Hawk,” said Roland.

The CAB is scheduled for more deck landings in the coming months to keep current pilots proficient and to qualify additional Chinook crews.

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Category: News, Training

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