USARPAC community celebrates diversity

| June 6, 2014 | 0 Comments
Members of the Chinese Lion Dance Association perform a traditional lion dance to celebrate Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month at the Exchange, Friday.

Members of the Chinese Lion Dance Association perform a traditional lion dance to celebrate Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month at the Exchange, Friday.

 

Story and photos by Spc. David Innes
8th Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs

 

“I remember as a child, I found a beautiful Japanese ceramic doll and asked my grandma about it,” said Rep. Beth Fukumoto, minority floor leader for the Hawaii House of Representatives.

The doll represented a rare moment in Fukumoto’s childhood, which was mostly void of objects reflecting her Japanese culture.

Fukumoto’s family experienced the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor, and its impact left a lasting impression on the American.

She shared this fact and other childhood memories with U.S. Army-Pacific troops who gathered at the Fort Shafter Post Exchange, May 29, for this year’s Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month Observance, hosted by the 130th Engineer Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command.

“The event was dedicated to recognizing the many contributions of Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage ancestry, but also served to educate the community,” said Sgt. 1st Class Rita Washington, Equal Opportunity advisor, 25th Infantry Division.

Members of the Takio Pacific Center demonstrate and perform taiko, a traditional Japanese music using only percussion instrument.

Members of the Takio Pacific Center demonstrate and perform taiko, a traditional Japanese music using only percussion instrument.

 

 

 

In addition to Fukumoto’s moving comments, the event featured song and dance, as children and adults from the Chinese Lion Dance Association performed a smaller version of a traditional lion dance.

The observance highlighted some of the many influences Asian-American and Pacific Islander cultures continue to have more than 170 years later.

“This month of May is chosen because it commemorates the first immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843,” said Washington.

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Category: News, Observances

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