‘Bronco’ clinic committed to Soldier health, readiness

| August 13, 2014 | 0 Comments
Col. Scott Kelly (left), commander, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, and Col. Pete Eberhardt (right), commander, U.S. Army Health Clinic-Schofield Barracks, unveil the newly renamed Bronco Embedded Behavioral Health clinic, July 30. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Catrina Herbert 3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

Col. Scott Kelly (left), commander, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, and Col. Pete Eberhardt (right), commander, U.S. Army Health Clinic-Schofield Barracks, unveil the newly renamed Bronco Embedded Behavioral Health clinic, July 30. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Catrina Herbert, 3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs,
25th Infantry Division)

Staff Sgt. Catrina Herbert
3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldiers gained a new tool to remain “Bronco Strong” after the unveiling of the newly renamed Bronco Embedded Behavioral Health (BEBH) clinic on Schofield Barracks, July 30.

The mission is to work in partnership with the command to preserve the fighting force and increase mission readiness through early identification of Soldiers with behavioral health challenges, consultation and communication with command leadership, rapid access to care, and provision of high-quality behavioral health care.

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“This is a great day to be in the Army. We have some great leadership that is committed to the behavioral health of our Soldiers,” said Col. Pete Eberhardt, commander, U.S. Army Health Clinic Schofield Barracks.

The BEBH clinic is an early intervention and treatment facility that promotes readiness for all Bronco Brigade Soldiers.

The clinic, which is located near the Troop Medical Center, here, on the second floor, is staffed by psychologists, mental health technicians, a nurse practitioner and other professionals in order to deal with a wide variety of behavior health issues.

Maj. Samuel Preston, chief of the Behavioral Health Department said, “The purpose of renaming the building was to let the command know that we support and understand them; we are a member of their team.”

BEBH’s goal is to assist and support command teams in strengthening their formation by restoring the Soldier to optimum readiness and health. The clinic does not just treat Soldiers who have existing issues; it tries to find patterns and determines the best plan of action to reduce future issues.

Preston stated, “Renaming the clinic symbolically unites us with the unified mission of the brigade, which is to have the best Soldiers moving forward and capable of fighting and winning America’s wars.”

“They (the BEBH team) have a huge responsibility in helping our Soldiers to remain healthy and proficient at what they do,” said Col. Scott Kelly, commander, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division.

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The Bronco Embedded Health Team stands in front of the newly renamed Bronco Embedded Behavioral Health during a renaming ceremony, here, July 30. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Catrina Herbert, 3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — The Bronco Embedded Health Team stands in front of the newly renamed Bronco Embedded Behavioral Health during a renaming ceremony, here, July 30. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Catrina Herbert, 3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs, 25th Infantry Division)

The team has already improved behavioral health outcomes, allowing more treatment for Soldiers.

During the open house, the providers took the afternoon to educate the command teams on the services offered and what they can do to help reduce future problems.

Some of the workshops and classes that are being offered are Coping Skills, Anger Management, Relaxation and Stress Management training.

“The clinic’s staff are all truly dedicated and appreciated by all of the Soldiers and units they support,” said Preston. “We really owe a lot to this team for their willingness and desire to make sure our commanders and Soldiers are best supported.”

“By teaching Soldiers coping skills, as well as getting them to admit to what’s going on and seek help, they are affecting the lives of Soldiers and their families. I am grateful for what they do,” said Kelly.

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Category: Health, News

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