CW5 visits USARPAC CWOs

| September 26, 2014 | 0 Comments
Chief Warrant Officer 5 David Williams, Army Staff Senior Warrant Officer, meets with senior warrant officers assigned to U.S. Army-Pacific during his first visit to the Pacific region. Williams was chosen by Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Raymond Odierno, who created the ARSTAF SWO to help advance the Warrant Officer Corps. (Photo by Story and photo by Staff Sgt. Kyle J. Richardson, U.S. Army-Pacific Public Affairs)

Chief Warrant Officer 5 David Williams, Army Staff Senior Warrant Officer, meets with senior warrant officers assigned to U.S. Army-Pacific during his first visit to the Pacific region. Williams was chosen by Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Raymond Odierno, who created the ARSTAF SWO to help advance the Warrant Officer Corps. (Photo by Story and photo by Staff Sgt. Kyle J. Richardson, U.S. Army-Pacific Public Affairs)

Story and photo by Staff Sgt. Kyle J. Richardson
U.S. Army-Pacific Public Affairs

FORT SHAFTER — After seven months as the first Army Staff Senior Warrant Officer (ARSTAF SWO), Chief Warrant Officer 5 David Williams, takes his first trip to the Pacific region to meet with senior warrant officers assigned to U.S. Army-Pacific, Sept. 8-22.

Williams will spend several days with senior warrant officers stationed at Hawaii and South Korea discussing warrant officer issues, training and leader development.

Chief of Staff of the Army, Gen. Raymond Odierno, created the ARSTAF SWO to help advance the Warrant Officer Corps, which was established in 1918. The newly created position provides a bridge for warrant officers in the field with representation at the Pentagon, said Chief Warrant Officer 5 Mike Kelly, USARPAC’s senior warrant officer advisor.

Williams said the position provides the CSA subject matter expertise on all aspects of warrant officer training and development.

“The ARSTAF SWO will communicate with commanders and warrant officers throughout the ‘Total Army’ to ensure their concerns and recommendations are considered in decisions that will impact the future of the corps,” said Odierno. “The ARSTAF SWO will advise me on the proper balance of training, education and professional experience for warrant officers to ensure they are fully prepared to support the Army and joint force of the future.”

Williams stated he was honored to hold the position and planned to carry out the CSA’s intent.

“Whether I was the first, second or third person to hold this position doesn’t matter; it is an honor and a privilege, without question, to sit in this seat,” said Williams. “When you’re the first anything, there are some challenges. I’m kind of writing the playbook for the position, and I’m also making sure I follow the Chief of Staff’s intent as I go along.”
While Williams has held the position since March, he has traveled around the U.S. meeting with senior warrant officers and discussing issues they have observed throughout the corps.

“Right now, I’m making sure warrant officers are filling warrant officer positions,” he said. “In the last few decades, the Army has gotten away from warrant officers being technical experts and filling other roles in organizations while contractors filled the roles of warrant officers.”

With more than 30,000 warrant officers making up less than three percent of the Army’s total, Williams said he expects to travel a lot.

“As I make my way around the Pacific, I want to make sure everyone understands the Chief of Staff’s top priorities,” Williams said. “I want to make sure the senior warrant officers understand how they can make improvements in leader development and make sure those who need their professional military education receive that opportunity.”

Williams also stated that the Army was cutting back on contractors and re-engaging warrant officers with their specialties. As the Army is preparing to change, he said that he wanted to ensure that the Warrant Officer Corps was ready for the way ahead.

“What we’re working on now is called Warrant Officer 2025,” he said. “What we’re trying to ascertain is what will the warrant officer in 2025 look like, what will that warrant officer need and do we have those resources in place.

“One of the most important key factors for warrant officers, not only in the Pacific, but all across the Army, is that they understand they have to have balance when it comes to leader development and technical expertise,” he said.

As Williams continues to travel visiting with warrant officers, he said, overall, that the corps looks good, but there is always room for improvement and growth. He said he plans to assist the corps with the resources needed to make that change happen.

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Category: Leadership, News

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