CAB preps for South Korea rotation

| October 24, 2014 | 0 Comments
Aviation warriors of the 2nd Sqdn, 6th Cav. Regt., 25th CAB, 25th ID, listen to a briefing presented by their 2nd CAB, 8th Army, counterparts, Oct. 15, about their upcoming rotation to the Republic of Korea. The briefing was part of a week of training intended to prepare the 70 Tropic Lightning Soldiers for their transition to flying in a host nation’s airspace.

Aviation warriors of the 2nd Sqdn, 6th Cav. Regt., 25th CAB, 25th ID, listen to a briefing presented by their 2nd CAB, 8th Army, counterparts, Oct. 15, about their upcoming rotation to the Republic of Korea. The briefing was part of a week of training intended to prepare the 70 Tropic Lightning Soldiers for their transition to flying in a host nation’s airspace.

Air Force Staff Sgt. Chris Hubenthal
Defense Media Activity-Hawaii News Bureau

 

WHEELER ARMY AIRFIELD — Tropic Lightning aviators received instructions from their 8th Army counterparts of the 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade, Oct. 15, for their upcoming rotation to the Republic of Korea.

The day of instruction was part of a weeklong opportunity designed to better prepare 70 Soldiers of the 2nd Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division.

“We’re talking mostly about general airspace rules and regulations that are covered in the 8th Army and the United States Forces Korea regulations that apply to aviation operations in South Korea,” said Chief Warrant Officer 5 Sean Magonigal, 2nd CAB standardization officer. “We let them know what to expect and give them ideas on how they can integrate with our Korean partners.”

The rotation will be some of the 25th CAB Soldiers’ first time flying aircraft in South Korea.

“The big difference is that it’s a foreign government’s airspace,” Magonigal said. “We don’t own the air or the land in Korea, so we work with our Republic of Korea allies in establishing the rules. We have Army rules and Army regulations, and we also must abide by our host nation rules and regulations, and then also work with our partners there.”

The ability to provide standards to units rotating to South Korea, prior to them arriving, has benefited the overall transition in the past.

“It really has smoothed the transitions,” Magonigal said. “The 2-6 CAB, here, from Hawaii, is the third rotational squadron to come to South Korea, so we have taken the lessons learned from the first two units that have come, and each time we’re getting a little bit better at formulating a plan and also honing the things that we teach that are most beneficial.”

Magonigal hopes that the information can help Soldiers of the 25th CAB experience a smoother transition and provide them with a greater perspective of the things they may need to train on prior to their rotation.

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Category: Defense Media Activity, Deployed Forces, News

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