First Hawaii-taught master resiliency trainer class graduates

| December 9, 2014 | 0 Comments

NCOs participate in a class lecture as part of the first MRT class to be taught by instructors local to Hawaii. Previously, MRT training required MTTs or distant travel.

NCOs participate in a class lecture as part of the first MRT class to be taught by instructors local to Hawaii. Previously, MRT training required MTTs or distant travel.

Story and photo by Staff Sgt. Sean Everette
25th Infantry Division Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Resiliency is a relatively new buzzword in the Army, only really becoming a common term within the past five years or so.

The Ready and Resilient Campaign, launched in early 2013, really brought the concept as it relates to Soldiers to the forefront.

The Army has been training master resilience trainers as fast as it can, but Hawaii units have either had to send leaders off-island to take the training or bring mobile training teams here.

That is no longer the case. The first master resiliency training class taught by local instructors graduated Nov. 21.

“Right now, we are one of five installations able to do this on our own without having to bring people in or send people TDY (temporary duty),” said Maj. Christopher Haynes, the 25th Infantry Division master resilience trainer and purveying medicine officer. “For the past year and a half, we’ve been working on creating the correct level of instructors, so we can conduct this training ourselves.”

Sgt. 1st Class Dustin Olverson, a motor sergeant from 3rd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th ID, attended the class and believes resiliency is a much-needed skill in today’s Army.

“This course is not only going to make you a better leader,” he said, “but will enhance your character strengths and your ability to lead your Soldiers through tough times, deployments, family issues and day-to-day life.”

Maj. Gen. James Pasquarette, former director of the Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness Center and current U.S. Army-Pacific deputy commanding general, came and spoke to the class the day before graduation and broke down the basics of what the course is about.

“Resilience is about two things,” he said. “No. 1, it’s about problem solving. No. 2, it’s about relationships. The intent of the program is to make everybody better than they would be without the training. The theory is, and the science is, that resilience can be taught and can be improved. That’s what this class has been about. We give you these skills, so you can teach them to Soldiers and improve everybody in your company or unit.”

The first class graduating comes just as U.S. Army-Hawaii is kicking off its new “Don’t Be a BySTANDer! Take a STAND!” campaign aimed at highlighting and preventing the 4 Ss: substance abuse, sexual assault, suicide and safety violations. Resilience plays a big part in the new campaign.

“It ties right into it,” said Haynes. “Having emotional and mental control ties directly back to the four Ss. If you’re emotionally in control, you aren’t going to do those types of things.”

Haynes also said that, ultimately, it boils down to improving our Soldiers.

“The more resilient our Soldiers are, the faster they will recover from negative events, giving us more time to complete our mission,” he said.

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Category: News, Training

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