Cacti Soldiers Conduct a Combat Focused PRT Assessment

| December 12, 2014 | 0 Comments
A H.Co., 2-35 IN, 3rd BCT, 25th ID Soldier simulates a needle chest decompression for Chest Trauma Pneumothorax during PRT. (Photo courtesy of 3rd Brigade Combat Team)

A H.Co., 2-35 IN, 3rd BCT, 25th ID Soldier simulates a needle chest decompression for Chest Trauma Pneumothorax during PRT. (Photo courtesy of 3rd Brigade Combat Team)

1st Lt. Loren Bell
3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Soldier readiness is key to any successful mission. To ensure physical readiness, Soldiers must challenge themselves with precise, progressive and integrated physical training program.

The Soldiers of the 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division are taking that to the next level to prepare for the harsh realities of full spectrum operations.

Signal Soldiers from Havoc Company reach the final leg of their timed ruck march, which was part of their PRT. (Photo by 3rd Brigade Combat Team)

Intel. Soldiers from Havoc Company reach the final leg of their timed ruck march, which was part of their PRT. (Photo by 3rd Brigade Combat Team)

Infantry Soldiers need to be prepared to move heavy things long distances and quickly move a casualty to safety over unforgiving terrain while in their full combat load. Infantry Soldiers must also provide initial medical care to casualties on the battlefield, which is why H.Co., 2-35 IN, 3rd BCT, 25th ID created the Combat Physical Readiness Test (PRT) assessment.

However, these skills are not just for the infantryman. With the company’s diverse Soldier population,  the test had to meet the needs for all Soldiers regardless of their military occupational specialty (MOS).

“The Havoc PRT Assessment is designed to establish a baseline of combat fitness across multiple MOSs that Leaders/Soldiers can use to set goals and develop PRT plans,” said Capt. Trevor Corrigan, Commander, H.Co., 2-35 IN, 3rd BCT, 25th ID.  “We looked at the Army’s MOS Handbook to determine physical requirements for each specialty; however it fails to address physical requirements that exist in a direct action environment.  For example, the physical requirements for a Human Resources Specialist are not the same as those required during direct actions, such as having the ability to pull a fellow Soldier out of a vehicle that has been ambushed, move them to safety, and conduct buddy aid.”

The unique assessment is two days of events consisting of multiple timed exercises including; bench press, squats, dead lifts, metronome pullups in full Kit, a 1.5 Mile run and  a six mile timed ruck march, culminating with various medical tasks such as assess and treat a casualty, applying a tourniquet, executing needle chest decompression and loading and moving a casualty.

“Every member of our team will understand that their brothers and sisters are physically capable of performing basic Combat Life Saving functions while under physical duress, said Corrigan.”

This assessment gives leadership a great indication of a Soldier’s physical combat readiness and possible areas for improvement. Currently, Soldiers train hard to pass the APFT but H.Co. Soldiers also train to face life or death scenarios that their chosen career field might require. This test helps shift their way of thinking from training to pass a test, to training to bring their brothers and sisters back home safe.

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