USARPAC boosts training innovation with Pacific Pathways

| December 19, 2014 | 0 Comments
U.S. and Malaysian Soldiers react to a small-arms fire in a simulated ambush during Counter Improvised Explosive Device training at KDP, Malaysia, Sept. 20. The interoperability between forces enables strong partnerships and a continuing commitment toward peacekeeping missions in Asia Pacific. (Photo by Sgt.1st Class Adora Gonzalez, 25th ID Public Affairs).

U.S. and Malaysian Soldiers react to a small-arms fire in a simulated ambush during Counter Improvised Explosive Device training at KDP, Malaysia, Sept. 20. The interoperability between forces enables strong partnerships and a continuing commitment toward peacekeeping missions in Asia Pacific. (Photo by Sgt.1st Class Adora Gonzalez, 25th ID Public Affairs).

Staff Sgt. Kyle J. Richardson
U.S. Army-Pacific Public Affairs

FORT SHAFTER — As 2014 closes, U.S. Army-Pacific is taking planning and executing operations to new levels by building upon allied and partner nation relationships throughout the Indo-Asia Pacific region.

USARPAC continues to strengthen and broaden U.S. Army relationships through a series of engagements with the introduction of the new Pacific Pathways training innovation.

Chief Warrant Officer Two Jake Uber with the 1st Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade out of Fort Carson, Colo., gives Soldiers from the 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, and Indonesian Armed Forces' 411th Raider Infantry Battalion, a AH-64 Apache familiarization briefs during Garuda Shield 2014. The exercise is a bilateral, tactical military exercise sponsored by U.S. Army Pacific Command and hosted by the Indonesian armed forces. Approximately 1,200 personnel from U.S. Army and Indonesian Armed Forces will conduct a series of training events focused on peace support operations. (Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Brooks Fletcher, 16th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

Chief Warrant Officer Two Jake Uber with the 1st Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade out of Fort Carson, Colo., gives Soldiers from the 2-1 Regmt., 2nd SBCT, 2nd ID, and Indonesian Armed Forces’ 411th Raider Infantry Battalion, a AH-64 Apache familiarization briefs during Garuda Shield 2014. . (Photo by Sgt. Brooks Fletcher, 16th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

“Pacific Pathways is a new model of operational deployments,” said Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, commander, USARPAC. “It builds on our experiences of deploying into other areas of the world while applying this deployment construct prior to a crisis emerging. Pacific Pathways stimulates our planning and operations skills, and opens opportunities for significant whole of government and multinational relationship enhancements that must be the foundation of (U.S. Pacific Command’s) work in this critical Indo-Asia Pacific region.”

Pacific Pathways meets allied and partner nation requests for increased engagements and focused training.

“Pathways demonstrates the U.S. military’s presence and commitment to the region,” Brooks said.

USARPAC engages in more than 130 events throughout the Pacific, annually. Pacific Pathways employs a task force using a series of consecutive bilateral and multilateral exercises and engagements with foreign militaries.

Army officials say the concept provides greater mission and fiscal predictability for U.S. Army forces and develops adaptive leaders and Soldiers for complex missions.

“The units have to think through the planning for a deployment and then execute it,” said Maj. Gen. Charles Flynn, commander, 25th Infantry Division.

He described the process as “an operational deployment that is exercising capabilities, versus simply an exercise.”

An AH-64E Apache helicopter with the 1st Attack Helicopter Battalion, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division leads an Indonesian army MI-35 during flight instructions for attack operations training at Ahmad Yani Army Aviation Base, Semarang, Indonesia, Sept. 9.  Apache helicopters are participating in Garuda Shield 14, a regularly scheduled, bilateral exercise sponsored by the U.S. Army Pacific and hosted annually by the  Tentara Nasional Indonesia (TNI - Indonesian Armed Forces). This year marks the eighth iteration of this continuing effort to promote regional peace and security. (U.S. Army photo by Chief Warrant Officer 3 Christian Muir)

An AH-64E Apache helicopter with the 1st Attack Helicopter Battalion, 25th CAB, 25th ID leads an Indonesian army MI-35 during flight instructions for attack operations training at Ahmad Yani Army Aviation Base, Semarang, Indonesia, Sept. 9. Apache helicopters are participating in Garuda Shield 14, a regularly scheduled, bilateral exercise sponsored by the U.S. Army Pacific and hosted annually by the TNI – Indonesian Armed Forces). (Photo by Chief Warrant Officer 3 Christian Muir)

Instead of one small unit traveling to an exercise for a short amount of time, Pathways concentrates on maximizing a deploying task force’s readiness, reducing redundancies in theater, maximizing cooperative opportunities and placings forces throughout the Pacific theater for an extended period, which has never been done before in the region.

The Pathway’s rotational force will increase the U.S. Army presence in the Pacific without the need of building new military installations. Pacific Pathways also creates increased readiness for U.S. Army and partner forces during multinational training engagements through a full range of missions.

Pacific Pathways began earlier this year with a four-month three-series exercise: Garuda Shield; Indonesia, Keris Strike; Malaysia and Orient Shield; Japan. The three exercises offered realistic training in a variety of climates, terrain and environments. During the one-month gap in exercises, the Soldiers participated in port operations and expanded their cultural knowledge with familiarization and cultural awareness training.

USARPAC’s I Corps and 25th ID provided command and control along with additional support for the first series of exercises for the Pacific Pathways concept.

Throughout the deployment, Soldiers will have opportunities to conduct numerous training scenarios, including a bilateral live-fire exercise with Strykers, AH-64 Apaches, UH-60 Black Hawks and HH-60 Pave Hawks. The training will also include an air assault, bilateral jungle training, medical first responder training, mounted counter-improvised explosive device training, unmanned aerial surveillance training and port operations.

Next year, the Pathway’s deployment will increase to a nine-month rotation incorporating exercises: Cobra Gold, Thailand; Foal Eagle, South Korea; and Balikatan, Philippines.

While the Pacific will continue to gain attention and refocused efforts, Pacific Pathways will continue building many partnerships, so all Indo-Asia Pacific partners can benefit from an environment that ensures peace, prosperity and a stable future for the entire region.

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Category: News, Year in Review

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