Platoon leaders put to the test in LFX

| January 16, 2015 | 0 Comments
Soldiers of  Co. A, 2-27th Inf. Regt., 3rd BCT, 25th ID, manuever through rough terrain to descend a hill on KR5 range, Jan. 8.

Soldiers of Co. A, 2-27th Inf. Regt., 3rd BCT, 25th ID, manuever through rough terrain to descend a hill on KR5 range, Jan. 8.

 

Sgt. Brian C. Erickson
3rd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs
25th Infantry Division

 

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — With the sound of bullets in the air, with boots and uniforms caked with mud, Soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, advanced on a targeted location during a live-fire exercise on KR5 range, Jan. 8.

The purpose of this operation was to evaluate and certify all platoon leaders as capable of multi-echelon synchronization and decision-making under a stressful environment.

Running Jan. 7-12, a different platoon was scheduled to complete the complex operation each day.

According to the battalion commander, this field problem was designed to be as lifelike as possible.

“The concept for this exercise is so complex in order to make it as realistic as possible without endangering our Soldiers,” said Lt. Col. Kevin J. Williams, commander, 2-27th Inf. Regt.

To make this range replicate combat situations, enablers were used throughout the exercise.

During the mission, each platoon leader had to communicate with the Air Force support element, a mortar team and mounted vehicles at the same time as guiding Soldiers on the ground.

Pvt. Kaleb Young, Alpha Company, 2-27th Inf. Regt., 3rd BCT, 25th ID, pulls security for his platoon during a live-fire exercise on KR5 range, Jan. 8.

Pvt. Kaleb Young, Alpha Company, 2-27th Inf. Regt., 3rd BCT, 25th ID, pulls security
for his platoon during a live-fire exercise on KR5 range, Jan. 8.

“I think the complexity of this mission really came from using the enablers,” said Sgt. Brian Shelton, squad leader, 2nd Platoon, Company A, 2-27th Inf. Regt.

In order to complete the range tasks, each platoon leader had to lead Soldiers through both a day and night movement. But before the Soldiers could conduct the night operation, they had to successfully complete daytime iterations of the mission with both blank and live ammunition.

According to the platoon sergeant, an infantryman has to hone and master his craft during the daytime before he can think of mastering night operations.

If the Soldiers thought the terrain was tough during the day, a squad leader confirmed it was harder at night.

“During the night, everything out there blends together, making it real difficult to maneuver through the harsh terrain,” said Shelton.

By the end of the exercise, the command team will be able to confidently know whether or not the platoon leaders can handle their mission set according to the battalion command team.

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Category: News, Training

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