Love of Learning: Army library programs designed to foster learning

| January 30, 2015 | 0 Comments
Young participants display eagerness to take part in demonstrations of science at Fort Shafter Library, Wednesday. (Photos by Ken Tokunana, Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation.

Young participants display eagerness to take part in demonstrations of science at Fort Shafter Library, Wednesday. (Photos by Ken Tokunana, Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation.

Jack Wiers
Pau Hana Editor
FORT SHAFTER — “Electric Ed” Carbonell worked the young crowd with ease, Wednesday, here, at the library, as eager hands and arms flew skyward when a request was made for volunteer help.

The Imagination Stations of Hawaii presentation by Carbonell is designed to use magic to lure young minds and attention spans into the world of science.

Twice a year, both, here, and at Sgt. Yano Library, Schofield Barracks, the Mad Science program is offered as Army library supervisors broaden the role of their facilities as “a place of learning.”

“One goal is to excite people’s curiosity,” said Amy Nogami, chief, Library Activities Branch, Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation. “Then, they will come back and find out more.”

Photos by Ken Tokunaga, Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation "Mad Scientist" Ed Carbonell demonstrates science as magic to young attendees, Wednesday, at the Fort Shafter Library as part of the FMWR's ongoing programs to make the libraries "a place for learning."

Photos by Ken Tokunaga, Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation
“Mad Scientist” Ed Carbonell demonstrates science as magic to young attendees, Wednesday, at the Fort Shafter Library as part of the FMWR’s ongoing programs to make the libraries “a place for learning.”

Science as Magic
Carbonell has educated thousands of young people in Southern California and Hawaii through the Mad Science program during the past 10 years. He is a passionate educator.
While he was an Air Force officer, he even trained astronauts at NASA.

But he said his biggest joy is watching children’s eyes get big when they understand an experiment. He also enjoys hearing them say “science is cool.”

Using the techniques of a magician, Carbonell demonstrated a variety of science principles on this day, including absorbency, vacuums, tornados and the relationship between air pressure and gravity.

“It’s fun to get them excited about science,” said Carbonell, a graduate of Damien School here in Honolulu.

Members of the Jones family traveled from Pearl Harbor to enjoy the learning experience. (Photo by Jack Wiers, Pau Hana Editor)

Members of the Jones family traveled from Pearl Harbor to enjoy the learning experience. (Photo by Jack Wiers, Pau Hana Editor)

Among the attendees were the Jones family from Pearl Harbor, who learned about Mad Science in the newspaper. Mother, Chaz Jones, said she has been looking for educational programs to enhance her children’s education since the family arrived in Hawaii last October.

“I’m home-schooling them,” said Jones, mother of Sydney, age 8, and 6-year-old Alexander, “so I thought this was the perfect way to get them some science.”

Wednesday, both children began the session seated in the back, but quickly moved forward to participate in the demonstrations.

Not just Books
Meanwhile, Army and FMWR officials continue to look at new programs and initiatives to continue to broaden the libraries’ appeal, not to mention relevancy, in the 21st century.

Interactive programs, such as Mad Science, are designed to provide “shock andIMGP4082_w awe” excitement to the library, according to Nogami.

Preschool age storytelling programs, manga art and themed-craft programs also regularly dot the library calendar.

In a design to keep pace with technology, the library offers ebooks, video and game rentals, computer and Wi-Fi access.

“The goal is to have something for everybody,” Nogami said, “and we do take suggestions.”

February 2015
Library Calendar of Events

Sgt. Yano Library, Schofield Barracks
Preschool Story Times: Children 3-5 years old can listen to stories, sing and dance, and make a craft. From 10-10:45 a.m., Feb. 4 and Feb. 18.
Teen Manga Club: Youth 12-17 years old are encouraged to bring their fan art, ideas for manga and purchasing suggestions. From 3-3:45 p.m., Feb. 11 and Feb. 25.
Signing Story Time: Librarians will read stories in English and American Sign Language. The theme is Valentine’s Day. From 6-6:45 p.m., Feb. 9.
After School at the Library: Children 6 and older can stop by to listen to stories and make a Valentine’s Day craft. From 3-4 p.m., Feb. 11.
Chinese New Year: Tweens, teens and adults are invited to stop by and make lanterns to celebrate the Chinese New Year. The library will supply the materials; you bring your imagination. From 3-4:30 p.m., Feb. 18.

Fort Shafter Library
Preschool Story Times: Children 3-5 years old can listen to stories, sing and dance, and make a craft. From 10-10:45 a.m., Feb. 3 and Feb. 17.
Make ‘n Take: Drop by and weave a Valentine’s Day heart. All ages are welcome, but young children will need parental assistance. From 3-4 p.m., Feb. 4.
Fairy Story Time: Visit the library for a special, fairy-themed story time. This event is for children 3 years and older. From 3-3:45 p.m., Feb. 18.

Learn More Online
For more about Fort Shafter and Sgt. Yano library events, activities and resources, visit HiMWR.com.

B1_booksFall in love with a book
Karen A. Iwamoto
Staff Writer
The Sgt. Yano and Fort Shafter libraries want you to take a chance on love … with a book.

The Blind Date with a Book program launches Feb. 6 – in time for Valentine’s Day – and runs through March 13.

The idea is to expose readers to different genres and to get them reading something they otherwise wouldn’t. The program and the books are geared toward adult readers.

How it Works
Librarians will wrap about 100 books in paper, with only the briefest of hints, such as the book’s genre, for potential readers.

Those who are open to this blind date, with a twist, will check out the book without knowing what book they’re taking home.

After they finish reading the book, they can fill out a form to rate the read. The ratings form also serves as a drawing for a Navatek Sunset Dinner Cruise for two provided by the Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation’s Travel Leisure Services.

This means that even if the blind date turns out to be a flop, participants still have a chance to sail off into the sunset with a real-life date.

Amy Nogami, chief, Libraries Activity Branch, said she got the idea for Blind Date with a Book from another library’s social media website. The concept intrigued her and she decided to give it a try.

“This is the first time we’re trying this, so we’ll see how it goes,” she said. “We’ll see how adventurous people will be.”

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Category: Community, Education

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