2nd SBCT, Royal Thai conduct CLS training

| February 19, 2015 | 0 Comments
Royal Thai Soldiers with the 31st Infantry Regiment, Kings Guard, train with U.S. Army medics of 225 Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, on lifesaving medical techniques in preparation for exercise Cobra Gold 15 on Camp 31-1, near Lop Buri, Thailand, Feb. 8.  Cobra Gold 15 is a multilateral joint training exercise involving 25 nations. This year’s training is focused on increasing the ability to support humanitarian interests of civilian populations around the region. (Photo by , Washington National Guard)

Royal Thai Soldiers with the 31st Infantry Regiment, Kings Guard, train with U.S. Army medics of 225 Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, on lifesaving medical techniques in preparation for exercise Cobra Gold 15 on Camp 31-1, near Lop Buri, Thailand, Feb. 8. Cobra Gold 15 is a multilateral joint training exercise involving 25 nations. This year’s training is focused on increasing the ability to support humanitarian interests of civilian populations around the region. (Photo by , Washington National Guard)

Sgt. 1st Class Adora Gonzalez
25th Infantry Division Public Affairs

LOP BURI, Thailand — U.S. Army medics with Company C, 225th Brigade Sustainment Battalion, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, teamed up with Royal Thai Army soldiers of the 31st Infantry Regiment, King’s Guard Rapid Deployment Force, to conduct two separate weeklong joint medical training classes during exercise Cobra Gold 15.

The training gave Soldiers from both nations an opportunity to build stronger bonds with their counterparts while cross training on medical techniques and equipment to improve joint medical capabilities.

2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, medic Sgt. Eileen Todard, assists Sgt. Warchat Hongsuna and Sgt. Suttipong Polnked, with the 31st Infantry Regiment, King’s Guard, while they apply the medical techniques they learned during joint medical training, Feb. 8, 2015. (Photo by Pfc. Brianne Patterson, Washington National Guard, 122nd Public Affairs Operations Center)

2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, medic Sgt. Eileen Todard, assists Sgt. Warchat Hongsuna and Sgt. Suttipong Polnked, with the 31st Infantry Regiment, King’s Guard, while they apply the medical techniques they learned during joint medical training, Feb. 8, 2015. (Photo by Pfc. Brianne Patterson, Washington National Guard, 122nd Public Affairs Operations Center)

“We are exchanging medical techniques with the Royal Thai Army and teaching them our Combat Lifesaver Course,” said Sgt. Elizabeth Griffin, a medic with 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 2nd SBCT. “Their infantry, as well as some of their medics, have been helping to teach us their techniques.”

After the weeklong training sessions, the Thai soldiers conducted CLS certification drills to test their ability to use the techniques in a simulated, fast-paced environment, which prepares them to apply the methods in a real-world scenario.

“This training is a very good opportunity for us to join and learn and exchange knowledge with each other,” said 2nd Lt. Csarnroot Tsongyei, a platoon leader for 31-3rd Inf. Regt. “We learn how to use a lot of the new technology and equipment‚ and we can show the Soldiers of the U.S. Army what we have, which is good for in the future.”

A total of 43 Royal Thai Army soldiers received official Combat Livesaver certification.

“We learned how to use the first aid kits of the U.S. Soldiers,” said Tsongyei. “We learned so many different ways to help someone and save someone.”

The sharing of medical techniques introduces Soldiers from both nations to new methods and fortifies the interoperability between the two militaries, while demonstrating a strong partnership.

“Working with the Royal Thai Army has been a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” said Griffin. “They are very professional, and their professionalism has been a large contributing factor to the success of this training.”

The joint training between these two nations allows Soldiers to carry home the new skills they have learned with them and share them with their fellow Soldiers, continuously building a stronger Army and nation.

Royal Thai Army Soldiers with the 31st Infantry Regiment, King’s Guard, train with U.S. Army medics of 225 Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, on lifesaving medical techniques during exercise Cobra Gold 15 on Camp 31-1, near Lop Buri, Thailand, Feb. 8.  (Photo by Pfc. Brianne Patterson, Washington National Guard, 122nd Public Affairs Operations Center)

Royal Thai Army Soldiers with the 31st Infantry Regiment, King’s Guard, train with U.S. Army medics of 225 Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, on lifesaving medical techniques during exercise Cobra Gold 15 on Camp 31-1, near Lop Buri, Thailand, Feb. 8. (Photo by Pfc. Brianne Patterson, Washington National Guard, 122nd Public Affairs Operations Center)

“They have a lot of techniques that we don’t have in the U.S. military that incorporates the environment and how they use their interventions, so I get to take that knowledge of actually utilizing the environment more than relying on my aid bag,” said Griffin.

Exercises such as Cobra Gold allow the U.S. and Royal Thai Army to continuously come together to strengthen the partnership they have been building for the past 182 years.

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Category: Deployed Forces, Exercises, News, Safety, Training

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