Young Alaka’i program develops tomorrow’s strategic leaders

| February 19, 2015 | 0 Comments
Participants in the 8th TSC’s new leader development program, Young Alaka'i, conduct Physical Readiness Training with the 8th TSC Command Group, Feb. 10, at Fort Shafter Flatts. The pilot of the program kicked off Feb. 9, as 22 of the unit's top-performing captains, senior noncommissioned officers (sergeants first class and master sergeants), and mid-grade warrant officers gathered at Hale Ikena, Fort Shafter, Hawaii, for the first of three phases of the program. (Spc. David Innes, 8th Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

Participants in the 8th TSC’s new leader development program, Young Alaka’i, conduct Physical Readiness Training with the 8th TSC Command Group, Feb. 10, at Fort Shafter Flats. The pilot of the program kicked off Feb. 9, as 22 of the unit’s top-performing captains, senior noncommissioned officers (sergeants first class and master sergeants), and mid-grade warrant officers gathered at Hale Ikena, Fort Shafter, for the first of three phases of the program. (Photo by Spc. David Innes, 8th Theater Sustainment Command Public
Affairs)

8th Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs

FORT SHAFTER — Alaka’i is the Hawaiian value of leadership used to describe one who leads by example with the initiative and strength of character to continually seek to grow and gain the trust of others.

An organization’s investment in its Alaka’i is an investment in its future, and that’s exactly what fueled the formation of the 8th Theater Sustainment Command’s new leader development program – Young Alaka’i.

The TSC launched the initiative Feb. 9, as 22 of the unit’s top-performing captains, senior noncommissioned officers (sergeants first class and master sergeants) and mid-grade warrant officers gathered at the Hale Ikena, here, to begin the first of the program’s three phases designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the Pacific theater from a contemporary, historical and strategic perspective.

“In a diverse, complex operating environment, it’s imperative that we prepare and train our upcoming young leaders and identify talented future Army leaders,” said Maj. Gen. Edward Dorman III, the 8th TSC commander. “The Army and the 8th TSC are looking at new, innovative ways to teach leaders about the dynamics of operational and strategic levels.”

Participants in the 8th TSC’s new leader development program, Young Alaka'i, conduct Physical Readiness Training with the 8th TSC Command Group, Feb. 10, at Fort Shafter Flats. (Photo by Spc. David Innes, 8th Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

Participants in the 8th TSC’s new leader development program, Young Alaka’i, conduct Physical Readiness Training with the 8th TSC Command Group, Feb. 10, at Fort Shafter Flats. (Photo by Spc. David Innes, 8th Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs)

The program is a dynamic broadening opportunity where participants interact directly with the 8th TSC commanding general and other flag officers at the executive levels to mold them for future success and assignments, said Maj. Jason Berdou, one of the program developers and a member of the 8th TSC Commander’s Initiative Group.

He said, “Our vision is to provide an ‘in-stride academic training session’ for a cohort group of both officers and NCOs that can be successful at any level, in all environments, today or in the future.”

The leaders represent the TSC’s 8th Special Troops Battalion, 45th Sustainment Brigade, 8th Military Police Bde., 130th Engineer Bde., and 10th Regional Support Group.

To minimize disruption to their ongoing missions, the program is broken into three one-week phases spread over six months. Each group of participants is known as a tribe.

Phase one, “Leadership and the Army Profession,” is internally focused with tribe members learning from each other about their different branches and military occupational specialties, and examining critical aspects of successful leadership from a group of experts in their fields. This phase will also introduce participants to the missions and capabilities across the TSC through events, lectures and discussions.

Phase two, “Strategic Thinking in the Indo-Asia Pacific,” is a broader U.S. Army-Pacific-level experience of multi-day events to get the Young Alaka’i tribe familiarized with the U.S. Pacific Command, USARPAC, the Department of State, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and other agencies. Senior mentors will guide the Young Alaka’i to reach a broader perspective by sharing their leadership skills and perspective.

Phase three will focus on alumni development and is designed to build upon previous phases while continuing to leverage the Young Alaka’i, through specific skills, tribe affiliation, areas of interest or competence to enhance the overall 8th TSC and USARPAC enterprise.

One of the key features of the program is that it does not end after phase three. The Young Alaka’i concept is for tribes from each cohort to network and remain in contact throughout their careers, and to also be available to future cohorts.

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Category: Leadership, News

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