USAHC-SB strides towards innovative caregiving

| March 26, 2015 | 3 Comments
The Warrior Ohana Medical Home provides access to quality, primary care right in the heart of Kalaeloa, the former Barbers Point Naval Air Station. (Photo by Aiko Brum, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

The Warrior Ohana Medical Home provides access to quality, primary care right in the heart of Kalaeloa, the former Barbers Point Naval Air Station. (Photo by Aiko Brum, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii Public Affairs)

U.S. Army Health Clinic-Schofield Barracks
News Release
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Army Medicine leads the nation in transforming the delivery of health care.

The U.S Army Health Clinic-Schofield Barracks invites you to be a member of this better way forward by actively participating in our Patient-Centered Medical Homes (PCMH).

Using the PCMH model, we are transforming Army Medicine’s Health Care System into a System for Health.

Variety of services
In efforts to provide the most value for your time, we offer a wide variety of coordinated health care services under one roof.

The Schofield Barracks PCMH features clinical pharmacy, nutrition, nurse case management, smoking cessation, embedded behavioral health and on-site OB GYN providers, no referral needed.
With a team-based approach, you get a broader scope of medical care. We recognize easier access to medical care is important to patients.

Army Medicine invests in several tools to increase ease of access. One tool that enhances access to medical care is portability; no matter where you are located, the resources below are available to you.

Nurse Advice Line: The NAL is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. NAL can advise when and how to seek care for an urgent problem or give instruction on self-care at home.
Patients can schedule next-day appointments with their primary care team. Call the NAL at 1-800-TRICARE (874-2273), Option 1.
Relay Health: It’s a secure email messaging system that gives patients access to communicate directly with their provider and nursing team. It is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Patients can request appointments, prescription refills, labs and X-ray results, track referrals and communicate with their PCMH care team.
Tricare Online: Members who register for TOL at their assigned military treatment facility can schedule appointments, check the status of prescription medications, refill prescriptions and view test results.

Most health care systems do not engage patients until they reach out for care. When a patient enrolls in one of the medical homes, they are assigned a team of medical professionals focused on providing personalized comprehensive health care. This includes updating patients on preventive measures designed to keep them from becoming ill. Don’t be surprised if you receive one of our reminders on preventive services as our team focuses on your health.

Whether you are new to the community or are a long-established patient at Schofield, we invite you to attend one of our clinic tours to see the PCMH difference for yourself. Every third Thursday of the month, the USAHC-SB conducts a clinic tour, which begins in the Pharmacy waiting room at 2 p.m. There are no reservations required.

Making Contact
Schofield PCMH is open to any tri-service dependent who is enrolled in TRICARE Prime. To check on or update your enrollment, call United Healthcare at 1-877-988-9378.

Schofield PCMH has both Family Medicine and Pediatric Care Teams; the choice is yours.
One site to look up your latest preventive health measures is at www.uhcpreventivecare.com. Contact your provider via email, phone or with a visit to learn more.

TOL also provides members real-time access to enrollment-related transactions, like updating an address or telephone number and transferring enrollment between a TRICARE region or facility.

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Category: Community, Health

Comments (3)

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  1. Karen Englerth Campbell says:

    Hello. My parents were in Hawaii during WW2. My mother was a nurse (ANC) at Hickam Station Field Hospital and my father was an ophthalmologist at 147th Temporary Hospital.

    I am looking for locally stored information about either or both of them, and I was hoping you have an archivist or other very old records expert that could help me.

    My mother’s name was Allene Josephine Davidson, N-738045; and my father was Frederick Louis Englerth, MD (entered the Army May 27, 1937).

    My mother was awarded the Legion of Merit by General Hale but I only have the official photos of that event with nothing from official documents–all were lost in the 1973 fire. Possibly any of Hawaii Army Weekly’s predecessors that existed then might have some information about that event–there were several nurses getting medals, and the photos were taken by the official photographer from Ft Shafter.

    I know this is not your usual inquiry, but if you have ANY suggestions or information that might be useful to me, I would greatly appreciate it.

    Thank you for the work you do–and even for the future people like me, looking for help with the history of people who served our country.

    Yours with respect,
    Karen Campbell

    • haw says:

      Hello, Ms. Campbell — The Hawaii Army Weekly archive is online at http://www.hawaiiarmyweekly.com. Simply search names and ideas in the top right area.
      Also, you may contact the Tropic Lightning Museum at (808) 655-0438 and ask if any information is located in physically bound newspapers, stored there prior to online retrieval. However, please note that the museum staffing has decreased and limited support is available.
      Finally, also search http://www.25thida.org/TL for news from 1966-1971; the former commercial newspapers the Honolulu Advertiser or the Honolulu Star-Bulletin; or the current commercial paper, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Aloha, HAW staff.

      • Karen Englerth Campbell says:

        Thank you for your reply. Unfortunately, the archives only go back so far, and I need things from 1940-1946. The real help would be if the NARA hadn’t burned down in 1973! But no one can change the fact the vast majority of records are gone–yet, I am thankful for your reply which gave me ideas for other sources.
        KC

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