205th MI conducts medical evacuation training

| April 3, 2015 | 0 Comments
Soldiers from HHD, 205th MI Bn., 500th MI Bde., load a simulated patient onto an UH-60 Black Hawk during a medical evacuation training exercise at Fort Shafter Flats, March 20. The training provided realistic hands-on experience for the Soldiers.

Soldiers from HHD, 205th MI Bn., 500th MI Bde., load a simulated patient onto an UH-60 Black Hawk during a medical evacuation training exercise at Fort Shafter Flats, March 20.

Story and photos by Staff Sgt. Thomas G. Collins
500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

FORT SHAFTER — Soldiers from Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 205th Military Intelligence Battalion, 500th MI Brigade, partnered with an aircrew from Company C, 3rd General Aviation Support Bn., 25th Combat Avn. Bde., to conduct aerial medical evacuation training, here, March 20.

The “Pacific Vigilance” Bn. demonstrated its commitment to realistic, hands-on, integrated and fully resourced training.

“By coordinating with the aviation unit to bring in rotary wing aircraft, we are able to enhance our readiness and incorporate real hands-on training as opposed to using mock ups or simulated training aids,” said Sgt. 1st Class Michael R. Lukowski, detachment noncommissioned officer in charge. “This gives us more realistic training.”

“I believe that doing hands-on training helps you learn better,” said Pvt. Peter Tibbetts, wheeled vehicle mechanic. “It helps get everyone focused and excited about the training event.”

It isn’t everyday that Soldiers get to train with a UH-60 Black Hawk.

“We were doing medical evacuation training, and after sending up a 9-line medevac request, the helicopter came and landed,” said Tibbetts. “We were able to talk to the crew and ask questions about their experiences.”

In addition to the Soldiers, the pilots and crew of the Black Hawk also benefited from the training.

oldiers from Headquarters and Headquarters Det., 205th MI Bn., 500th MI Bde., load a simulated patient onto an UH-60 Blackhawk during a medical evacuation training exercise, Fort Shafter Flats, March 20. The training provided realistic hands-on experience for the Soldiers. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Thomas G. Collins, 500th MI Brigade Public Affairs)

 The training provided realistic hands-on experience for the Soldiers.

“There is a mutual benefit to training events like these,” said Capt. Christopher Y. Chung, air medical pilot and platoon leader, Charlie Co., 3-25th Avn. “We get to meet with the Soldiers and land our aircraft at the training areas that the Soldiers have available.”

Practicing landing on training sites allows pilots to get a feel for the area.

“The more we see of the island, the better prepared and more comfortable we will be if we have to go to that location in case of an emergency,” said Chung. “It’s good for Soldiers and commanders to get an understanding of the capabilities offered by the aircraft and what we can provide.”

Chung and his unit have conducted multiple training events in order to maintain flight status and proficiency.

“We have preformed different training missions,” said Chung. “We have trained with the Navy, conducting deck landing qualifications, so we can land on Navy ships and help Sailors. We also conducted over water hoist missions with the Marines.”

Soldiers of the 205th now have a better understanding of what is expected from the Soldiers on the ground and what they can expect from the medevac crew.

An aircrew from Co. C, 3rd General ASB, 25th CAB, lands a UH-60 Black Hawk on an athletic field on Fort Shafter Flats, March 20.  The crew arrives at the request of HHD, 205th MI “Pacific Vigilance” Bn., 500th MI Bde., in order to provide more realistic medical evacuation training and familiarize the intelligence troops with medevac procedures.

An aircrew from Co. C, 3rd General ASB, 25th CAB, lands a UH-60 Black Hawk on an athletic field on Fort Shafter Flats, March 20, at the request of the “Pacific Vigilance” Bn.

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Category: Exercises, News, Training

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