MMA inspires combat conditioning

| April 10, 2015 | 0 Comments
Chevas Lamoya (center, pointing),  Iraq War veteran and former 82nd Airborne Division Soldier, instructs warriors of HHD, 500th MI Bde., during an MMA-inspired  workout at the UFC Gym in Waikele, April 1. The Soldiers performed movements and techniques derived from various fighting styles to increase overall physical fitness.

Chevas Lamoya (center, pointing), Iraq War veteran and former 82nd Airborne Division Soldier, instructs warriors of HHD, 500th MI Bde., during an MMA-inspired workout at the UFC Gym in Waikele, April 1. The Soldiers performed movements and techniques derived from various fighting styles to increase overall physical fitness.

Staff Sgt. Thomas G. Collins
500th Military Intelligence Brigade Public Affairs

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS — Junior enlisted Soldiers from 500th Military Intelligence Brigade participated in a mixed martial arts-inspired circuit-training workout at the UFC Gym BJ Penn in Waikele, April 1.

The session, spearheaded by 500th MI Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment 1st Sgt. Gabriel C. Huerta, and conducted by Chevas Lamoya, a coach at the gym, started off with a warm-up, a conditioning circuit and cool down exercises.

Spc.  Paul Sneed, a human intelligence specialist, HHD, 500th MI Bde., performs a burpie during an MMA-inspired workout at the UFC Gym in Waikele on April 1. The Soldiers performed various movements and techniques to increase mobility and endurance, two components of the Army Physical Readiness Training program. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Thomas G. Collins, 500th Military Intelligence Public Affairs)

Spc. Paul Sneed, a human intelligence specialist, HHD, 500th MI Bde., performs a burpie during an MMA-inspired workout at the UFC Gym in Waikele on April 1. The Soldiers performed various movements and techniques to increase mobility and endurance, two components of the Army Physical Readiness Training program. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Thomas G. Collins, 500th Military Intelligence Public Affairs)

“It was a very basic training circuit consisting of four rounds of five stations, with 2 minutes at each station followed by a 1-minute rest cycle,” said Huerta, a 15-year veteran of combative sports. “These exercises are low impact, but still got you sweating and your heart rate going.”

Working on mobility and endurance, two components of the Army’s physical readiness training program, the circuit provided ideas for the Soldiers to incorporate in their own workouts.

“The intent for coming here to workout was to change up the routine and show the Soldiers different exercises they can do on their own,” said Huerta.

Spc. Paul Sneed, human intelligence specialist, HHD, 500th MI, liked the change of pace.

“It was a nice change of pace than the normal PRT that we do on a regular basis. Also, it was a nice chance for us to do PT with 1st Sgt. Huerta,” said Sneed.

“My primary goal was camaraderie by using a fun physical activity and pushing them to be competitive in the process,” said Huerta.

Even during a fun event, the Soldiers must maintain readiness.

“It’s the Soldier’s responsibility to stay fit and combat ready, and it is our job as leaders to show them how,” Huerta explained.

Combat, much like fighting in mixed martial arts, requires mental resiliency and physical strength that can only be taught by realistic, consistent training.

“What we try to do as coaches is to simulate the movements of an actual fight,” said Lamoya, an Iraq veteran who served with the 82nd Airborne Division. “I have always been a believer of training hard. The act of pushing through pain and still having to fight plays into the mental aspect. You can’t really simulate the stress involved any other time unless you are downrange or in an actual fight.”

Being in combat or a fight requires you to be in top physical condition.

“There is so much that goes into fighting – the adrenaline rush, the physical and mental side of it, drains the energy right out of you,” said Lamoya. “If anyone has ever been in a fight, they know it doesn’t take much before you get winded.”

While preparing for the stress of a fight, just like combat, you must use similar movements and techniques. Hard work and training builds resiliency.

“Just having that mental strength to push through your pain threshold and continue the fight is an important advantage to have,” said Lamoya.

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Category: News, Training

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