18th MEDCOM (DS) shines a light on taking back the night

| April 24, 2015 | 0 Comments

 

HONOLULU--Children from the community carried the banner during the ‘Take Back the Night’ walk, hosted by the 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support), held at Aliamanu Military Reservation Community Center, April 16, 2015.According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street. Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

HONOLULU–Children from the community carried the banner during the ‘Take Back the Night’ walk, hosted by the 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support), held at Aliamanu Military Reservation Community Center, April 16, 2015.According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street. Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

Story and photos by
Sgt. 1st Class Nicole Howell

18th Medical Deployment Command (Deployment Support)

HONOLULU — The 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) hosted the U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii South “Take Back the Night” walk to increase awareness and prevention of sexual crimes within the military, April 16, 2015.

According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street.

Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

HONOLULU--Col. Bret Ackermann, the 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) commander, and Brig. Gen. Patrick Sargent, the Pacific Regional Medical Center’s commanding general, handed the ‘Take Back the Night’ banner to the Family members who led the way during the TBTN walk, April 16, 2015.   According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street. Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

HONOLULU–Col. Bret Ackermann, the 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) commander, and Brig. Gen. Patrick Sargent, the Pacific Regional Medical Center’s commanding general, handed the ‘Take Back the Night’ banner to the Family members who led the way during the TBTN walk, April 16, 2015.
According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street. Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

Col. Bret T. Ackermann, the 18th MEDCOM (DS) commander, along with Brig. Gen. Patrick Sargent, the Pacific Regional Health Command’s commanding general, spoke to the crowd about eliminating these crimes from within the ranks.

“None of this behavior has any place in our community,” said Sargent.” In our Army, there is no place for it, so let’s walk and let each step we take be a step toward eradication of this evil out of our army and out of our community.”

Ackermann echoed the words of Sargent.

“This evening we come together to speak out against sexual violence and raise community awareness,” said Ackermann. “Tonight we demonstrate our commitment to cultivating a culture focused on trust, dignity and respect that reaffirms the Army’s reputation as a mission-ready, values-based organization.”

To kick off the walk, Ackermann asked 18th MEDCOM (DS) Soldiers and family members to help him read statements from a document called “Why We Walk.” From within the crowd voices could be heard.

“To remember the ones who have survived, and those who have been taken from us, as a result of sexual violence,” said one woman from the crowd.

“To speak out against violence and raise community awareness as a prevention measure against future violence,” said a male Soldier.

Family members from the crowd carried the Sexual Harassment/Assault Awareness and Prevention banner for 1 mile, followed by a large crowd carrying glow sticks and flashlights. The lights were to signify the crowds commitment to taking back the night.

HONOLULU--Military Families participate in the one-mile ‘Take Back the Night’ walk hosted by the 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) to show their support for ending sexual assaults and harassment within the military, April 16, 2015. According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street. Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

HONOLULU–Military Families participate in the one-mile ‘Take Back the Night’ walk hosted by the 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) to show their support for ending sexual assaults and harassment within the military, April 16, 2015. According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street. Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

“These types of events help bring awareness to the community, Soldiers, families and civilians, and it makes us stronger as a community,” said Sgt. 1st Class Reynaldo Torres, a noncommissioned officer at the Regional Cyber Center Pacific, 516th Signal Brigade. “This event will keep everyone one, in the long run, aware of what is going on within SHARP (Sexual Harassment\Awareness Response Program).”

The 18th MEDCOM (DS) leadership wanted the participants to leave with the at least one key point: that sexual harassment and assault still occur and each person can help change the military’s culture.

“We continue to strive for an environment where professional values, team commitment and respect define how we treat one another at every command, workplace and throughout our military communities,” said Ackermann. “We have to act. We must hold each other accountable. Sexual violence is a reality for many and we cannot ignore this!”

HONOLULU--Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas Wrighton Jr., the 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) command sgt. maj., talks to the Military Family Life Counselors during the 18th MEDCOM (DS) “Take Back the Night” walk held at Aliamanu Military Reservation Community Center, April 16, 2015. According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street. Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

HONOLULU–Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas Wrighton Jr., the 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support) command sgt. maj., talks to the Military Family Life Counselors during the 18th MEDCOM (DS) “Take Back the Night” walk held at Aliamanu Military Reservation Community Center, April 16, 2015. According to the Take Back the Night website, this organization began more than a half century ago in Europe, where women from many countries met together as a tribunal council to discuss women’s safety when walking down the street. Today, TBTN has blossomed into a movement to end sexual violence and domestic violence through awareness events and initiatives.

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Category: News, Online Exclusives, SHARP, Take a Stand!

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